Tag Archives: Tom & Jerry

Cartoon of the Day: The Missing Mouse

The Missing Mouse

The Missing Mouse

From nearly the end of the theatrical series, The Missing Mouse was unique in a few ways. Popular voice actor Paul Frees- Captain Hook from Disney’s Peter Pan from the same year- handles the voice duties for this short, and therein is one of the unique aspects of the film.

While Jerry is looting the fridge, Tom comes by and hammers him… He pinches Jerry’s tail in a mousetrap, and while running away, the mouse spills a bottle of white shoe polish on himself.

Suddenly, the radio blurts out that an experimental “explosive” white mouse has escaped from the lab. Tom sees Jerry and is frightened to death. Jerry takes advantage, and keeps trying to fall off shelves and such… the cat catching him no matter what. Tom lets irons and pianos fall on him instead of Jerry.

When the mouse falls in the sink, Tom realizes that he’s been a fool; he hits Jerry with a hammer and throws him out. The real white mouse then enters, and when Tom washes the fake one and then sees Jerry, he ages 50 years! The radio then announces that the explosive mouse is no longer dangerous… Tom strikes him and BOOM! The cat sticks his head out of the rubble and says, “Don’t you believe it!”

This is one of the rare cartoons in which Tom speaks; although here it sounds as though he is imitating character actor Ned Sparks in the final scene.

This is the only Tom and Jerry cartoon (and possibly the only MGM cartoon) for which Scott Bradley does not receive music credit.

 

 

Cartoon of the Day: Mouse Cleaning

Mouse Cleaning

Mouse Cleaning

Back before their television empire, back before the Flintstones and Scooby Doo, William Hanna and Joseph Barbera played a cat against a mouse. From Tom & Jerry, today’s cartoon of the day is Mouse Cleaning from this date in 1948.

Mammy-Two-Shoes tells Tom that if the house gets dirty or untidy, he will be thrown out. Once she leaves, Jerry uses a cigarette ashtray to spread filth all over the place. Gags and chase sequences ensue. Jerry diverts a coal chute into the living room as Mammy comes home.

She and Tom collide outside the front door. When Tom pokes his head out of the coal, he becomes a stereotypical black Stepin Fetchit-style character. Mammy thinks Tom is a man and asks, “Hey you! Has you seen a no-good cat around here?” Tom replies (in a stereotypical black voice), “No ma’am! I ain’t seen no cat around here! Uh-uh! No cat, no place, no how, no ma’am!”

Mammy spots Tom’s tomfoolery and yells “Thomas!” Tom runs away and hobbles along the sidewalk, shuffling and mumbling.

This cartoon was redubbed in the 1960s, with Mammy-Two-Shoes speaking in an aggressively non-racial white-bread accent (her legs are still 100% “of color,” though!).

Additionally, the scene where Tom, in blackface, does his “Stepin Fetchit” routine was excised and replaced with some newly-created animation by the Chuck Jones MGM unit nearly 20 years later.

Kenneth Muse did the animation in the sequence where Tom juggles eggs and an ink pad, according to animator Mark Kausler. Ed Barge animated the old horse and the coal, while the final sequences were done by Ray Patterson and Irv Spence.

Mouse For Sale (1955) – Tom and Jerry Cartoon Series

Mouse For Sale

Mouse For Sale

#CotD: A much more mature Tom and Jerry meet again in “Mouse For Sale” from 1955.

Mouse For Sale (1955) – Tom and Jerry Cartoon Series

White mice being all the rage, Tom paints Jerry white with the idea of selling him for a tidy profit.

Come see “Mouse For Sale” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

The Cat Concerto (1947) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon

The Cat Concerto

The Cat Concerto

CotD: Extremely similar to a WB cartoon staring Bugs Bunny, “The Cat Concerto” and Tom and Jerry ended up winning the Oscar that year- Bugs would wait another ten for his.

The Cat Concerto (1947) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon

Tom is an acknowledged master pianist primed to give his greatest performance of Liszt’s Second Hungarian Rhapsody. As he prepares and finally settles down, ready to play, Jerry is determined to disrupt Tom’s concert. Jerry pulls on the strings inside the piano, slams the shutter on Tom’s hands, and generally runs amok. Tom fights him with the piano without missing a single note.

Come see “The Cat Concerto” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Johann Mouse (1953) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Johann Mouse

Johann Mouse

CotD: Tom lost the grey stripe between his eyes in “Johann Mouse ” which won the seventh- and last- Tom & Jerry Oscar.

Johann Mouse (1953) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Little Johann Mouse- Jerry- can’t resist waltzing when he hears the piano playing from the Maestro, Johann Strauss, but when the music stops, so does the dancing. Therefore, Tom must learn to play the piano to keep the mouse dancing so that he can catch him.

Come see “Johann Mouse ” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

“Tom and Jerry” programming turns pornographic

Tom and Jerry

Tom and Jerry

Did a cat and mouse ever do anything like this?

When an Arlington, Texas mom’s young sons were viewing Tom and Jerry on The Cartoon Network, they suddenly saw more than they bargained for.

Rebekah Woodruff says that the boys, ages 4 and 7, had their eyes glued to the screen at about 12:30 p.m. Wednesday. The scene suddenly shifted, she alleges, to a pornographic movie.

“I heard the music change. And I heard my oldest say to his little brother, ‘Don’t watch this. I think it’s something bad,'” she recounted.

Dashing back to the living room, Mom saw graphic images of two women on the screen.

“We don’t have channels like that.”

Immediately, the mom asked her boys to turn around. She muted the sound and then looked at the remote to ensure they hadn’t somehow bought a pay-per-view movie.

She pushed the “information” button on the remote, she said. “And it says we’re watching Tom and Jerry, Cartoon Network, at 12:30.”

After pushing the “channel up” and “channel down” buttons, the channel returned to Tom and Jerry, but without the porn, she said.

“Most of the day, I’ve just held back tears,” she said. “I’m furious.”

Time Warner Cable, her cable company, apologized.

“We have our engineering team still looking into it,” said spokesman Jon Herrera said.

The problem doesn’t appear to have occurred across the system, as Woodruff’s complaint was the only one received by TWC, he added.

But Woodruff said she wants to know what was behind the snafu.

“I don’t need an ‘I’m sorry.’ I want them to be held accountable,” she said. “I can’t erase it from my kids’ minds. I can’t erase it from my mind.”

Puss Gets The Boot (1940) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Puss Gets The Boot (1940) - Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Puss Gets The Boot (1940) - Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: One of the most stories pairs in animation began their careers 72 years ago today in “Puss Gets The Boot” watch it today and see how it all started!

Puss Gets The Boot (1940) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

In close-up, Jerry the mouse runs from his opponent. The camera cuts back, and we see that Tom the cat (called Jasper in this film only) has already caught the mouse, who is running on the spot, his tail held by the cat’s claw.

While Tom toys with his prey, Jerry gets away, leading to a number of gags which result in the breaking of a vase. Mammy-Two-Shoes warns Tom that if he breaks one more thing, she’ll throw him out of the house. Jerry hears this; naturally, this is an opportunity that the mouse cannot pass up.

To keep Tom at bay, Jerry menaces every breakable object in the house. Tom (whom Mammy calls “you good-for-nothin’ cheap fur coat”) does his best to save them, but ultimately fails and gets the boot.

Come see “Puss Gets The Boot” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Posse Cat (1954) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Posse Cat (1954) - Tom and Jerry

Posse Cat (1954) - Tom and Jerry

CotD: Tom and Jerry are playing with firearms again in “Posse Cat“, much to Tom’s chagrin.

Posse Cat (1954) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Tom is hired to keep the cookhouse free of mice, but when he is refused a meal, he enlists Jerry’s help.

Come see “Posse Cat” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

The Missing Mouse (1953) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

The Missing Mouse (1953) - Tom and Jerry

The Missing Mouse (1953) - Tom and Jerry

CotD: You are in for a treat if you watch “The Missing Mouse” today; it is one of the few cartoons in which Tom speaks!

The Missing Mouse (1953) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

While Jerry is looting the fridge, Tom comes by and hammers him… He pinches Jerry’s tail in a mousetrap, and while running away, the mouse spills a bottle of white shoe polish on himself.

Suddenly, the radio blurts out that an experimental “explosive” white mouse has escaped from the lab. Tom sees Jerry and is frightened to death. Jerry takes advantage, and keeps trying to fall off shelves and such… the cat catching him no matter what. Tom lets irons and pianos fall on him instead of Jerry.

When the mouse falls in the sink, Tom realizes that he’s been a fool; he hits Jerry with a hammer and throws him out. The real white mouse then enters, and when Tom washes the fake one and then sees Jerry, he ages 50 years! The radio then announces that the explosive mouse is no longer dangerous… Tom strikes him and BOOM! The cat sticks his head out of the rubble and says, “Don’t you believe it!”

Watch “The Missing Mouse” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Flirty Birdy (1945) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Flirty Birdy (1945) - Tom and Jerry

Flirty Birdy (1945) - Tom and Jerry

CotD: Originally titles “Love Boids”, “Flirty Birdy” was a Tom and Jerry cartoon from 1945…

Flirty Birdy (1945) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Tom is all set to eat Jerry when an eagle swoops down and grabs Jerry. To get Jerry back, Tom poses as a female eagle, and quickly finds his new lover to be more than he bargained for.

Watch “Flirty Birdy” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase