Tag Archives: MGM

Droopy’s Good Deed (1951) – Droopy Cartoon Series

Droopy's Good Deed

Droopy's Good Deed

#CotD: One of the most heavily edited cartoons on TV, “Droopy’s Good Deed” featured Droopy and Spike as Boy Scouts. Comedy ensues.

Droopy’s Good Deed (1951) – Droopy Cartoon Series

Droopy and Spike are Boy Scouts who compete in several hilarious contests to see who will meet the President. Droopy attempts to do good deeds, but has various Spike-related hurdles to overcome first…

Come see “Droopy’s Good Deed” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

The Cat Concerto (1947) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon

The Cat Concerto

The Cat Concerto

CotD: Extremely similar to a WB cartoon staring Bugs Bunny, “The Cat Concerto” and Tom and Jerry ended up winning the Oscar that year- Bugs would wait another ten for his.

The Cat Concerto (1947) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon

Tom is an acknowledged master pianist primed to give his greatest performance of Liszt’s Second Hungarian Rhapsody. As he prepares and finally settles down, ready to play, Jerry is determined to disrupt Tom’s concert. Jerry pulls on the strings inside the piano, slams the shutter on Tom’s hands, and generally runs amok. Tom fights him with the piano without missing a single note.

Come see “The Cat Concerto” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

The Boy And The Wolf (1943) – MGM Theatrical Cartoon

The Boy And The Wolf

The Boy And The Wolf

CotD: Rudolf Ising was at the end of his career at MGM when he directed “The Boy And The Wolf” as a one-shot cartoon.

The Boy And The Wolf (1943) – MGM Theatrical Cartoon

A little Mexican boy is herding sheep with his dog Perrito. The boy plays a prank on Perrito, pretending the wolf is attacking the flock. Later, when the wolf really comes, Perrito at first doesn’t respond. However loyalty wins out and Perrito saves the day.

Come see “The Boy And The Wolf ” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

A Rainy Day (1940) – MGM Theatrical Cartoon

A Rainy Day

A Rainy Day

CotD: Reprising their first appearance in “Goldilocks And The Three Bears“, the Bear Family faces “A Rainy Day” and some incredible animation of the roof shingles turning into big waves.

A Rainy Day (1940) – MGM Theatrical Cartoon

Mama Bear persuades her reluctant husband Papa Bear to fix the shingles on the roof, a job that he put off doing. But the job proves larger than it first appeared, and he ends up trying to do the job in a violent rainstorm that escalates into a tornado, making things worse with each fit of temper. The task becomes far more highly perilous as well, between the attacking lightning, the slippery roof and the high winds.

Come see “A Rainy Day” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Señor Droopy (1949) – Droopy Theatrical Cartoon Series

Señor Droopy

Señor Droopy

CotD: The last collaboration between director Tex Avery and animator Preston Blair was on “Señor Droopy“.

Señor Droopy (1949) – Droopy Theatrical Cartoon Series

Droopy fights a bull and a wolfy bullfighter for the hand of a (live-action) senorita. He wins the bullfight and gets his girl, actress Lina Romay.

Come see “Señor Droopy” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Screwball Squirrel (1944) – Screwy Squirrel Cartoon Series

Screwball Squirrel

Screwball Squirrel

CotD: Screwy Squirrel first appeared in Tex Avery’s “Screwball Squirrel” from 1944. Contray to popular beleif, the directer did NOT voice Meathead.

Screwball Squirrel (1944) – Screwy Squirrel Cartoon Series

Cute little Sammy Squirrel is out looking for nuts when he meets Screwy Squirrel. Poor little Sammy gets beaten up behind a tree, but Screwy reassures us that we wouldn’t have liked the short anyway.

Screwy then insults Meathead, a pedigreed bird dog, who chases him around through the rest of the short. Screwy continuously provokes Meathead with violence and non-stop action.

When Meathead prepares to crawl through a hollow log while chasing Screwy, he sees the squirrel at the other end of the log holding a baseball bat. Meathead: “Duh- you’re not going to hit me with that bat, are you?” Screwy, looking at the audience, replies: “What do you think?” Later, Meathead is so tired and banged up from being the recipient of gag after gag that he begs for the cartoon to be over.

Come see “Screwball Squirrel” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Johann Mouse (1953) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Johann Mouse

Johann Mouse

CotD: Tom lost the grey stripe between his eyes in “Johann Mouse ” which won the seventh- and last- Tom & Jerry Oscar.

Johann Mouse (1953) – Tom and Jerry Theatrical Cartoon Series

Little Johann Mouse- Jerry- can’t resist waltzing when he hears the piano playing from the Maestro, Johann Strauss, but when the music stops, so does the dancing. Therefore, Tom must learn to play the piano to keep the mouse dancing so that he can catch him.

Come see “Johann Mouse ” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Dumb-Hounded (1943) – Droopy Theatrical Cartoon Series

Dumb-Hounded

Dumb-Hounded

CotD: Droopy first appeared in “Dumb-Hounded” from 1943, when he was named Happy Hound.

Dumb-Hounded (1943) – Droopy Theatrical Cartoon Series

Droopy tracks down escaped convict Wolf, and the chase leads all over the world. No matter where the Wolf tries to hide, Droopy is there to take him in. Of course, Droopy has a secret…

Come see “Dumb-Hounded” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Bosko’s Easter Eggs (1937) – Happy Harmonies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bosko's Easter Eggs (1937)

Bosko's Easter Eggs (1937)

CotD: Hugh Harmon and Rudolph Ising left Warner Bros. and took their character Bosko with them when they made “Bosko’s Easter Eggs” at MGM in 1937.

Bosko’s Easter Eggs (1937) – Happy Harmonies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bosko decides to help his girlfriend Honey collect eggs to color for Easter. He and his dog Bruno have all kinds of trouble with the chickens. Bruno breaks the eggs that Bosko “wuz deliverin ta” Honey.

Come see “Bosko’s Easter Eggs” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

The Shooting Of Dan McGoo (1945) – Droopy Theatrical Cartoon Series

The Shooting Of Dan McGoo

The Shooting Of Dan McGoo

CotD: Originally titled The Shooting of Dan McScrew, “The Shooting Of Dan McGoo” this film is loaded with great sight gags, and smacks heavily of World War II.

The Shooting Of Dan McGoo (1945) – Droopy Theatrical Cartoon Series

The story begins in Coldernell, Alaska- Population 320 and getting smaller. A wild, rough town where gold is king and gambling, drinking and shooting each other are the major activities.

Droopy is Dangerous Dan McGoo, a lone gambler, whose only love is the girl they call “Lou,” played by Red. The wolf drags himself into the saloon from the 50-below cold and immediately pays for “drinks on the house,” a sight gag that will be reused many years later by Jim Henson in “The Muppet Movie.” As always, the wolf falls for Lou, tries to drag her off and…

The lights went out!
A woman screamed!
Two guns blazed in the dark!

And when the lights come back up, Droopy is victorious, which makes you wonder why the picture is called “The Shooting of Dan McGoo” when he isn’t the one getting shot!

In one gag, the wolf wants a drink of whiskey (Old Panther). After he chugs it down, it shows his stomach being blasted from the drink. His eyes go red, and smoke comes out of his ears. He flies around the room and comes back to the bar. Leaning over to the bartender, he complains, “This stuff’s been cut.”

Come see the trailer for “The Shooting Of Dan McGoo” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase