Tag Archives: Merrie Melodies

The Fifth-Column Mouse (1943) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Fifth-Column Mouse

Fifth-Column Mouse

CotD: Friz gives us his ver­sion of an old Harmon-Ising style car­toon with “The Fifth-Column Mouse” updated to World War II themes.

The Fifth-Column Mouse (1943) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

In the kitchen, a trio of mice are singing “Ain’t We Got Fun” and float­ing on a bar of soap in the sink. A “friendly” cat bursts in and starts attack­ing the mice. He cor­ners one of them and offers him a bribe of cheese to let him join the mouse pack.

The cat tells the mouse that he can have all the cheese he wants if he will con­vince the other mice to be the cat’s slaves. Unfor­tu­nately, the mouse accepts and puts his friends in dan­ger. The cat uses trick­ery to catch and enslave the mice (he con­vinces them to serve him and he won’t eat them).

The cat is waited on hand and foot by the mice. When he announces that he wants a “nice, fat, ten­der mouse” for din­ner, they real­ize that they’ve been betrayed. Instead of pan­ick­ing, the brave mice, to the song “We Did It Before (And We Can Do It Again),” orga­nize an army to fight the cat.

The mouse army pre­pares for bat­tle and comes up with an attack plan. The mice build a mar­velous robot mechan­i­cal bull­dog with extend­ing chomp­ing teeth. The robotic bull­dog chases the cat. The mice then shave him with an elec­tric razor, leav­ing only a dot-dot-dot-dash pat­tern, which stands for the let­ter V (sig­ni­fy­ing vic­tory) in Morse code. The cat runs away and the mice win!

Come see “The Fifth-Column Mouse” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Duck Amuck (1949) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Duck Amuck (1949) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

Duck Amuck (1949) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Cartoon

CotD: Daffy Duck’s tour de force, “Duck Amuck” is one of his most mem­o­rable car­toons, and one of Chuck Jones’ great­est shorts.

Duck Amuck (1949) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Stand back, mus­ke­teers!” swords­man Daffy cries, sur­rounded by Dumasian scenery, cred­its and music. “They shall sam­ple my blade!” But within a few thrusts and touches, Daffy notices that the back­ground behind him has ended: “Hey, psst, whoever’s in charge here, the scenery, where’s the scenery?”

A paint­brush comes across the screen and puts down a farm­yard set­ting. Daffy leaps back in his mus­ke­teer garb, real­izes it’s inap­pro­pri­ate, and returns with over­alls and hoe, then notices that the scenery has changed into a North Pole set­ting: “Would it be to much to ask if we could make up our minds, hmmm?” And so it goes. After chang­ing from many clas­sic scenes and gags, Daffy yells, “All right! Enough is enough! This is the final, the very, very last straw! Who is respon­si­ble for this? I demand that you show your­self! Who are you?” Pull back to reveal Bugs Bunny, seated by a live-action animator’s light table, admit­ting to the audi­ence, “Gee, ain’t I a stinker?”-

Come see “Duck Amuck” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Ali Baba Bunny (1957) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Ali Baba Bunny  (1957) - Merrie Melodies

Ali Baba Bunny (1957) — Mer­rie Melodies

CotD: A car­toon ver­sion of the Hope/Crrosby Buddy pic­tures “Ali Baba Bunny ” paired Bugs against Daffy… and any­one knows who will win that match up.

Ali Baba Bunny (1957) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

After a goofed up left turn at Albu­querque (on their way to Pismo Beach), Bugs and Daffy end up in Ali Baba’s treasure-filled cave. Has­san Chop!

Come see “Ali Baba Bunny ” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs (1943) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs (1943) - Merrie Melodies

Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs (1943) — Mer­rie Melodies

CotD: Part war film and part Dis­ney send up, “Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs” is funny enough and sure to offend, but too good a short to be ignored.

Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs (1943) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

A black­face par­ody of Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs with a strong swing back­beat… and no apologies!

Mammy (who resem­bles Aunt Jemima) tells her “Honey Child” the story of “So White” and the wicked Queen who “was as rich as she was mean.” “She had every­thing,” includ­ing sugar, cof­fee, auto tires, scrap metal, Chat­tanooga choo-choos, and a fam­ily coat of arms con­sist­ing of dice and switch­blades. So White is a las­civ­i­ous sex­pot forced to wash miles and miles of laun­dry as she sings “Blues in the Night.” “Magic Mir­ror on the wall, send me a prince about six feet tall,” intones the Queen. When zoot-suited, thick-lipped hip­ster Prince Chawmin’ (who has dice for teeth!) finds So White “dyna­mite,” the Queen calls in Mur­der Inc. to “black out So White.” Prince Chawmin’ and the dwarfs are all minia­ture car­i­ca­tures of Fats Waller, except for one who resem­bles Stepin Fetchit. The prince kisses and tries to revive the heroine.

Watch “Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Big Top Bunny (1951) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Big Top Bunny (1951) - Merrie Melodies

Big Top Bunny (1951) — Mer­rie Melodies

CotD: Is Bruno the best act in the cir­cus? Watch “Big Top Bunny” and see who gets the last laugh!

Big Top Bunny (1951) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

When Bugs joins a trav­el­ing cir­cus, he vies to become the hit attrac­tion. His jeal­ous arch-enemy, Bruno the Russ­ian Bear, starts a feud, and always seems to be one step behind his co-star. Bruno tries to sab­o­tage Bugs at every level, but Bugs pre­vails. Even on the high wire, he makes a fool of the bear!

Watch “Big Top Bunny” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Transylvania 6–5000 (1963) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Transylvania 6-5000 (1963) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

Tran­syl­va­nia 6–5000 (1963) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Cartoon

CotD: Com­ing out about a month to late (for Hal­loween!) “Tran­syl­va­nia 6–5000″ was a great foray into hor­ror by Mr. Jones and pal Bugs.

Tran­syl­va­nia 6–5000 (1963) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

After tak­ing a wrong left turn, Bugs ends up in the cas­tle of a blood­thirsty Count. Luck­ily, Bugs knows the secret work, and con­founds the Count’s attempts to retrieve Bugs’ blood.

Watch “Tran­syl­va­nia 6–5000″ on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Bedtime For Sniffles (1940) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bedtime For Sniffles (1940) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

Bed­time For Snif­fles (1940) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Cartoon

CotD: One of Chuck Jones’ first major char­ac­ters, Snif­fles from “Bed­time For Snif­fles”, was voiced by a mys­tery woman.

Bed­time For Snif­fles (1940) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

In his lit­tle sar­dine can house, Snif­fles tries to stay awake and wait up to see Santa on Christ­mas Eve. Snif­fles is sweep­ing up and singing “Jin­gle Bells” while he waits for Santa. In just an hour, Santa will be here. He makes a cup of Haxwell Mouse Cof­fee and reads “Good Mouse­keep­ing” mag­a­zine while he waits, only to even­tu­ally fall asleep.

Watch “Bed­time For Snif­fles” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Inki And The Minah Bird (1943) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Inki And The Minah Bird (1943) - Merrie Melodies

Inki And The Minah Bird (1943) — Mer­rie Melodies

CotD: Prob­a­bly one of the least polit­i­cally cor­rect Warner Bros. car­toon, “Inki And The Minah Bird” had a char­ac­ter that re-occurred in four other shorts, too.

Inki And The Minah Bird (1943) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Inki is an African child who runs into a denture-wearing lion while hunt­ing with a spear. The lion then chases the young native all over cre­ation. The Minah Bird joins forces with Inki against the mighty lion, but pro­ceeds to mess every­thing up for all.

Watch “Inki And The Minah Bird ” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Rhapsody Rabbit (1946) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Rhapsody Rabbit (1946) - Merrie Melodies

Rhap­sody Rab­bit (1946) — Mer­rie Melodies

CotD: One of the most enig­matic mys­ter­ies in ani­ma­tion: which came first, “Rhap­sody Rab­bit” or MGM’s The Cat Con­certo.

Rhap­sody Rab­bit (1946) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Bugs tries to per­form a piano con­certo while deal­ing with the piano’s res­i­dent mouse.

Watch “Rhap­sody Rab­bit ” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

The Hare-Brained Hypnotist (1942) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

The Hare-Brained Hypnotist (1942) - Merrie Melodies

The Hare-Brained Hyp­no­tist (1942) — Mer­rie Melodies


CotD: “The Hare-Brained Hyp­no­tist” is quite a scary tale for your Hal­loween plea­sure– Enjoy!

The Hare-Brained Hyp­no­tist (1942) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Elmer walks in the woods read­ing a book called “Stalk­ing Wild Game.” A bear knocks him down. Elmer hyp­no­tizes it, con­vinc­ing the bear that it’s a canary, and the bear flies away.

He then meets Bugs, and starts try­ing to hyp­no­tize him. Bugs gives Elmer a bal­loon which car­ries him into the sky (past the canary-bear), and then offers to catch Elmer when he falls– in a bas­ket which turns out to be bottomless.

Elmer chases Bugs to his hole. They have a tug-of-war with the rifle. Elmer starts to cry, “How can I hyp­no­tize you when you won’t coop­er­ate?!” Bugs agrees to be a sport and hyp­no­tizes Elmer into think­ing that he’s a rab­bit. Elmer starts act­ing wacky and resumes the rifle tug-of-war. Bugs says, “Hey, who’s the come­dian in this picture?”

They then have a hyp­no­tism bat­tle. Elmer scam­pers away. Bugs takes off, say­ing, “Sorry, I’m due at the air­port, I’m a B-19!”

Watch “The Hare-Brained Hyp­no­tist ” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase