Tag Archives: Merrie Melodies

The Fifth-Column Mouse (1943) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Fifth-Column Mouse

Fifth-Column Mouse

CotD: Friz gives us his version of an old Harmon-Ising style cartoon with “The Fifth-Column Mouse” updated to World War II themes.

The Fifth-Column Mouse (1943) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

In the kitchen, a trio of mice are singing “Ain’t We Got Fun” and floating on a bar of soap in the sink. A “friendly” cat bursts in and starts attacking the mice. He corners one of them and offers him a bribe of cheese to let him join the mouse pack.

The cat tells the mouse that he can have all the cheese he wants if he will convince the other mice to be the cat’s slaves. Unfortunately, the mouse accepts and puts his friends in danger. The cat uses trickery to catch and enslave the mice (he convinces them to serve him and he won’t eat them).

The cat is waited on hand and foot by the mice. When he announces that he wants a “nice, fat, tender mouse” for dinner, they realize that they’ve been betrayed. Instead of panicking, the brave mice, to the song “We Did It Before (And We Can Do It Again),” organize an army to fight the cat.

The mouse army prepares for battle and comes up with an attack plan. The mice build a marvelous robot mechanical bulldog with extending chomping teeth. The robotic bulldog chases the cat. The mice then shave him with an electric razor, leaving only a dot-dot-dot-dash pattern, which stands for the letter V (signifying victory) in Morse code. The cat runs away and the mice win!

Come see “The Fifth-Column Mouse” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Duck Amuck (1949) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Duck Amuck (1949) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

Duck Amuck (1949) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

CotD: Daffy Duck’s tour de force, “Duck Amuck” is one of his most memorable cartoons, and one of Chuck Jones’ greatest shorts.

Duck Amuck (1949) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

“Stand back, musketeers!” swordsman Daffy cries, surrounded by Dumasian scenery, credits and music. “They shall sample my blade!” But within a few thrusts and touches, Daffy notices that the background behind him has ended: “Hey, psst, whoever’s in charge here, the scenery, where’s the scenery?”

A paintbrush comes across the screen and puts down a farmyard setting. Daffy leaps back in his musketeer garb, realizes it’s inappropriate, and returns with overalls and hoe, then notices that the scenery has changed into a North Pole setting: “Would it be to much to ask if we could make up our minds, hmmm?” And so it goes. After changing from many classic scenes and gags, Daffy yells, “All right! Enough is enough! This is the final, the very, very last straw! Who is responsible for this? I demand that you show yourself! Who are you?” Pull back to reveal Bugs Bunny, seated by a live-action animator’s light table, admitting to the audience, “Gee, ain’t I a stinker?”-

Come see “Duck Amuck” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Ali Baba Bunny (1957) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Ali Baba Bunny  (1957) - Merrie Melodies

Ali Baba Bunny (1957) - Merrie Melodies

CotD: A cartoon version of the Hope/Crrosby Buddy pictures “Ali Baba Bunny ” paired Bugs against Daffy… and anyone knows who will win that match up.

Ali Baba Bunny (1957) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

After a goofed up left turn at Albuquerque (on their way to Pismo Beach), Bugs and Daffy end up in Ali Baba’s treasure-filled cave. Hassan Chop!

Come see “Ali Baba Bunny ” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs (1943) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs (1943) - Merrie Melodies

Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs (1943) - Merrie Melodies

CotD: Part war film and part Disney send up, “Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs” is funny enough and sure to offend, but too good a short to be ignored.

Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs (1943) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

A blackface parody of Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs with a strong swing backbeat… and no apologies!

Mammy (who resembles Aunt Jemima) tells her “Honey Child” the story of “So White” and the wicked Queen who “was as rich as she was mean.” “She had everything,” including sugar, coffee, auto tires, scrap metal, Chattanooga choo-choos, and a family coat of arms consisting of dice and switchblades. So White is a lascivious sexpot forced to wash miles and miles of laundry as she sings “Blues in the Night.” “Magic Mirror on the wall, send me a prince about six feet tall,” intones the Queen. When zoot-suited, thick-lipped hipster Prince Chawmin’ (who has dice for teeth!) finds So White “dynamite,” the Queen calls in Murder Inc. to “black out So White.” Prince Chawmin’ and the dwarfs are all miniature caricatures of Fats Waller, except for one who resembles Stepin Fetchit. The prince kisses and tries to revive the heroine.

Watch “Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Big Top Bunny (1951) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Big Top Bunny (1951) - Merrie Melodies

Big Top Bunny (1951) - Merrie Melodies

CotD: Is Bruno the best act in the circus? Watch “Big Top Bunny” and see who gets the last laugh!

Big Top Bunny (1951) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

When Bugs joins a traveling circus, he vies to become the hit attraction. His jealous arch-enemy, Bruno the Russian Bear, starts a feud, and always seems to be one step behind his co-star. Bruno tries to sabotage Bugs at every level, but Bugs prevails. Even on the high wire, he makes a fool of the bear!

Watch “Big Top Bunny” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Transylvania 6-5000 (1963) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Transylvania 6-5000 (1963) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

Transylvania 6-5000 (1963) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

CotD: Coming out about a month to late (for Halloween!) “Transylvania 6-5000” was a great foray into horror by Mr. Jones and pal Bugs.

Transylvania 6-5000 (1963) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

After taking a wrong left turn, Bugs ends up in the castle of a bloodthirsty Count. Luckily, Bugs knows the secret work, and confounds the Count’s attempts to retrieve Bugs’ blood.

Watch “Transylvania 6-5000” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Bedtime For Sniffles (1940) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bedtime For Sniffles (1940) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

Bedtime For Sniffles (1940) - Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon

CotD: One of Chuck Jones’ first major characters, Sniffles from “Bedtime For Sniffles“, was voiced by a mystery woman.

Bedtime For Sniffles (1940) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

In his little sardine can house, Sniffles tries to stay awake and wait up to see Santa on Christmas Eve. Sniffles is sweeping up and singing “Jingle Bells” while he waits for Santa. In just an hour, Santa will be here. He makes a cup of Haxwell Mouse Coffee and reads “Good Mousekeeping” magazine while he waits, only to eventually fall asleep.

Watch “Bedtime For Sniffles” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Inki And The Minah Bird (1943) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Inki And The Minah Bird (1943) - Merrie Melodies

Inki And The Minah Bird (1943) - Merrie Melodies

CotD: Probably one of the least politically correct Warner Bros. cartoon, “Inki And The Minah Bird” had a character that re-occurred in four other shorts, too.

Inki And The Minah Bird (1943) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Inki is an African child who runs into a denture-wearing lion while hunting with a spear. The lion then chases the young native all over creation. The Minah Bird joins forces with Inki against the mighty lion, but proceeds to mess everything up for all.

Watch “Inki And The Minah Bird ” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Rhapsody Rabbit (1946) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Rhapsody Rabbit (1946) - Merrie Melodies

Rhapsody Rabbit (1946) - Merrie Melodies

CotD: One of the most enigmatic mysteries in animation: which came first, “Rhapsody Rabbit” or MGM’s The Cat Concerto.

Rhapsody Rabbit (1946) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bugs tries to perform a piano concerto while dealing with the piano’s resident mouse.

Watch “Rhapsody Rabbit ” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

The Hare-Brained Hypnotist (1942) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

The Hare-Brained Hypnotist (1942) - Merrie Melodies

The Hare-Brained Hypnotist (1942) - Merrie Melodies


CotD: “The Hare-Brained Hypnotist” is quite a scary tale for your Halloween pleasure- Enjoy!

The Hare-Brained Hypnotist (1942) – Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Elmer walks in the woods reading a book called “Stalking Wild Game.” A bear knocks him down. Elmer hypnotizes it, convincing the bear that it’s a canary, and the bear flies away.

He then meets Bugs, and starts trying to hypnotize him. Bugs gives Elmer a balloon which carries him into the sky (past the canary-bear), and then offers to catch Elmer when he falls- in a basket which turns out to be bottomless.

Elmer chases Bugs to his hole. They have a tug-of-war with the rifle. Elmer starts to cry, “How can I hypnotize you when you won’t cooperate?!” Bugs agrees to be a sport and hypnotizes Elmer into thinking that he’s a rabbit. Elmer starts acting wacky and resumes the rifle tug-of-war. Bugs says, “Hey, who’s the comedian in this picture?”

They then have a hypnotism battle. Elmer scampers away. Bugs takes off, saying, “Sorry, I’m due at the airport, I’m a B-19!”

Watch “The Hare-Brained Hypnotist ” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase