Tag Archives: Looney Tunes

Hare-Way To The Stars (1958) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Hare-Way To The Stars

Hare-Way To The Stars

CotD: Marvin the Martian takes on Bugs Bunny in “Hare-Way To The Stars, and the universe will never be quite the same again.

Hare-Way To The Stars (1958) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bugs Bunny, groggy from a rabbit hangover, climbs out of his hole and into a rocket ship parked directly above. He thinks that he’s still in his rabbit hole. Reaching the top, he unwittingly stows away aboard the rocket to Mars and is carried off by a satellite onto a futuristic landscape of panels suspended in outer space.

Bugs tries to rent a U-Drive flying saucer from a local character wearing a spittoon: Commander X-2 in his Roman hairbrush helmet. Marvin advises him not to bother, as “the Earth will be gone in just a few seconds. I’m going to blow it up- it obstructs my view of Venus.”

To save the planet from destruction, Bugs makes off with the Aludium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator that the Martian has built.

Come see “Hare-Way To The Stars” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Sahara Hare (1955) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Sahara Hare

Sahara Hare

CotD: The new Looney Tunes theme music begins with “Sahara Hare, a hare of Bugs and Sheik Riff Raff Sam in the desert.

Sahara Hare (1955) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

While digging a tunnel heading for Miami Beach, Bugs somehow ends up in the Sahara Desert. He trudges through the desert and sees a mirage. He dives in the mirage and takes a bath.

After getting “footy prints” all over the Sahara, he meets up with bedsheeted bandit “Sheik Riff Raff Sam” (played by Yosemite Sam, of course), who rides through the desert on his misguided, humpbacked camel. Sam, with towel-dispensing headdress, runs Bugs down. Bugs is drying his eyes and uses Sam’s headdress as a towel. Sam stops his camel from charging by hitting him over the head, thus giving him another hump. He also tells the animal, “Whoa, mule, whoa, mule!” Sam chases Bugs into a nearby deserted Foreign Legion fortress, battling Bugs in an unsuccessful attempt to get in (Bugs locks him out).

Sam tries to get an elephant to charge the door. Bugs releases a mouse, and the elephant flees. Sam tries to enter by pole vaulting, chiseling out one of the blocks, and trying to approach the fort with stilts (he smacks into a rock wall). Sam makes a giant slingshot using two trees and a rubber band; it throws him into a big tree. He finds a secret (labeled!) entrance and opens one door after the other till the last one, which is connected to explosives. Daffy Duck shows up at the very end.

Come see “Sahara Hare” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

The Scarlet Pumpernickel

The Scarlet Pumpernickel

CotD: One of Daffy’s greatest starring roles, “The Scarlet Pumpernickel” has our favorite duck at his ego-maniacal height.

The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Daffy “Dumas” Duck has written his own screenplay which parodies The Scarlet Pimpernel and tries to sell it to “J.L.,” the studio head. The cartoon concerns itself less with “The Scarlet Pimpernel,” Baroness Emmuska Orczy’s tale of an heroic figure who smuggles doomed noblemen out of Paris during the French Revolution, than with mocking swashbucklers in general and Errol Flynn in particular (Errol is mentioned no less than three times).

Daffy plays the title character, a dashing highwayman (as Flynn) with an unspecified mission in life, except to irritate the Lord High Chamberlain (Porky as Claude Rains). The Chamberlain, realizing that his daughter Melissa is the Scarlet Pumpernickel’s true love, arranges to marry her to the Grand Duke (Sylvester as Basil Rathbone), hoping that this will flush the Pumpernickel out of hiding. Elmer Fudd has a small part as the proprietor of the King’s Nostril Inn.

Come see “The Scarlet Pumpernickel” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Boom Boom (1936) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Boom Boom (1936) - Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Boom Boom (1936) - Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: Rarest of the rare, a leap year cartoon is hard to find. But we do have “Boom Boom” a Looney Tunes short from 1936.

Boom Boom (1936) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Porky Pig and Beans, his friend, are in the army together. When a carrier pigeon brings them news that General Hardtack is being held prisoner, Beans motorcycles to the rescue, dragging a reluctant Porky beside him in his sidecar. The two rescue the general and make their escape in a convenient airplane. After they land amidst an explosion, the three bandaged characters share a hospital bed. The general passes along one of his medals to Beans, who gives half to Porky.

Come see “Boom Boom” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Picador Porky (1949) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Picador Porky

Picador Porky

CotD: An early Porky short, “Picador Porky” is Mel Blanc’s first appearance in a Warner Bros. short.

Picador Porky (1949) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Slumbering peacefully ‘neath the warm caresses of the noonday sun lies the sleepy little village of La Rosita.

It presents a scene of serene quietude and beauty as its inhabitants enjoy a midday siesta preceding the annual bullfight.

“The solitude is broken only by the occasional strains of a soft guitar.”

Stone broke, Porky and two gringo-dog buddies have hoboed to a Mexican town, apparently on a drinking-binge vacation. They stumble (and we do mean “stumble”) across a sign about the annual bullfighting contest; the winner will receive 1,000 pesos. Porky and his two pals decide to cheat their way to the money by renting a bull costume and a matador outfit in order to win the prize. The plan is to substitute two of them in a bull costume for the real thing, with Porky fighting off the phony bull and then splitting the loot. But the old switcheroo takes place instead. In the bullring, it’s quite a while before Porky realizes that it’s not his friends in disguise, but a real (and very mean) bull whom he’s been out there abusing for the audience!

Come see “Picador Porky” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Mississippi Hare (1949) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Mississipp Hare

Mississipp Hare

CotD: While a popular Bugs Bunny short, “Mississippi Hare” was one of 12 pulled from rotation by the Cartoon Network for its 2001 “June Bugs” marathon.

Mississippi Hare (1949) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bugs stows away on the riverboat “The Southern Star.” He plays poker against riverboat gambler Colonel Shuffle. Bugs, with seven aces, beats Colonel Shuffle, who has only six.

Come see “Mississippi Hare” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Gift Wrapped (1952) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Gift Wrapped (1952) - Looney Tunes

Gift Wrapped (1952) - Looney Tunes

CotD: I wonder what Sylvester wants for Christmas? Watch “Gift Wrapped” and see what he gets!

Gift Wrapped (1952) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Sylvester can’t find a stirring mouse on Christmas Eve, and is overjoyed when Santa brings Tweety to Granny as a present. Sylvester switches Christmas-gift tags so he receives Tweety instead of a toy. Granny is puzzled when her gift is a rubber mouse, but then realizes what has happened when Sylvester burps up Tweety’s feathers. Tweety distracts Sylvester with another gift: a large bulldog, which devours the cat. Granny promptly beats the dog’s behind until Sylvester is spit out. He resumes his ploys and torments of Tweety until Granny has had enough.

Come see “Gift Wrapped” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Attack Of The Drones (2005) – Looney Tunes Cartoon Series

Attack Of The Drones (2005) - Looney Tunes

Attack Of The Drones (2005) - Looney Tunes

CotD: One of a series of 6 “Larry Doyle” Looney Tunes, “Attack Of The Drones ” never made it into theaters (even more were never even finished!).

Attack Of The Drones (2005) – Looney Tunes Cartoon Series

Duck Dodgers creates a group of robot replicas to destroy a space menace; then he lets the hero robots loose. Bad things happen.

Come see “Attack Of The Drones ” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Baseball Bugs (1946) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Baseball Bugs (1946) - Looney Tunes

Baseball Bugs (1946) - Looney Tunes

CotD: The Gashouse Gorillas take on the hometown favorites the Tea Totallers in “Baseball Bugs“… also look for one of the animators names proudly displayed on the bleachers.

Baseball Bugs (1946) – Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

The hometown Tea Totallers trail the brutish Gashouse Gorillas (42 to 0) until Bugs Bunny takes control of the field. Ready to slide into home, the quick-thinking bunny pulls out a pin-up to distract the catcher.

Come see “Baseball Bugs” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

“Daffy’s Rhapsody” debuts in theaters February 10

Daffy's Rhapsody still

Daffy's Rhapsody still

Moviegoers seeing the 3D family adventure “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” are in for a bonus reel of laughs and action with Daffy’s Rhapsody.

The original Looney Tunes cartoon short makes its theatrical debut in tandem with the feature film release from New Line Cinema and Warner Bros. Pictures, opening across the United States on Friday, February 10.

Three new images from this picture have been released, and are nopw on the BCDB site. Click through the Cartoon Pictures From Daffy’s Rhapsody link to see the newest images.

In Daffy’s Rhapsody, a brand-new escapade starring Elmer Fudd and Daffy Duck, a relaxing evening at the theater turns into hunting season when Fudd is surprised by the unexpected appearance of his perpetual and ever-elusive target, Daffy. As Elmer gives chase, Daffy cleverly evades him while regaling the audience with a song that illustrates his plight — how hunters never leave him alone.

Featuring an original story and all-new animation, the short stars the voice of the late, legendary Mel Blanc in Daffy’s song, recorded in the 1950s, alongside acclaimed voice actor Billy West’s current characterization of Elmer Fudd. Directed by Matthew O’Callaghan, it is the second in a new series of three original 3D cartoon shorts created for theatrical release, in keeping with Warner Bros. Animation’s commitment to present the Looney Tunes on the big screen as they were first enjoyed and embraced by audiences around the world.

Sam Register, executive vice-president for creative affairs of Warner Bros. Animation, served as executive producer on Daffy’s Rhapsody, as well as the first short of the series, last year’s I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat. He says, “Everyone grew up loving the Looney Tunes characters, and it has been both a great honor and an enormous challenge to continue the legacy of these animation icons and introduce them to a new generation of fans. To hear the incomparable Mel Blanc voicing these characters once more is nothing short of a dream come true.”

As with Journey 2: The Mysterious IslandDaffy’s Rhapsody will screen in both 2D and 3D, and in IMAX where available, in theaters across the U.S.