Tag Archives: Hanna-Barbera

Warner Brings Back Animated Stone-Age Family

flintstones-movieFunnyman Will Ferrell and partner Adam McKay are working on bringing back everyone’s favorite stone-age family. The duo’s production company Gary Sanchez Productions is in development on a new Flintstones animated feature. Warner Bros. previously tried a Flintstones TV series produced by Seth MacFarlane, but that project never got beyond the pilot stage.

Continue reading “Warner Brings Back Animated Stone-Age Family” »

Cartoon of the Day: I Yabba-Dabba Do!

I Yabba-Dabba Do!

I Yabba-Dabba Do!

Who is celebrating their twentieth anniversary today? The two stone-age kids that grew up next door to each other- Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm! In 1993, ABC aired I Yabba-Dabba Do!, a special directed by animation giant William Hanna. How tough was it for Fred to give away the bride?

Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm get married but not before enduring all the antics and confusion that seem to accompany every Flintstones affair.

Sort of the opposite of all those eighties cartoon series in which grown-up characters are shown in their youth. You know, the Muppet Babies, A Pup Named Scooby-Doo or Flintstone Kids….

 

Cartoon of the Day: Rebel Rumble

The Peter Potamus Show

The Peter Potamus Show

Today’s CotD is Rebel Rumble, an episode from The Peter Potamus Show. Hana and Barbera took a new tack with this show, one that would pay of for years. The studio began selling animated half-hour blocks directly into syndication. The new outlet grew the studio faster than anyone thought possible. After winning in syndication, ABC saw the light and brought this show back to network television.

Peter and So-So land in America during the time of the Revolution. Peter and So-So spread the word that the redcoats are coming from their balloon. They are shot down by British soldiers. They escape pursuit donning British uniforms but then are chased back to their balloon by American troops.

This show began its run in syndication as Peter Potamus and his Magic Flying Balloon, but was picked up by ABC on January 2, 1966.

Cartoon of the Day: Bewitched Bear

Bewitched Bear

Bewitched Bear

The episode Bewitched Bear is from the The Huckleberry Hound Show, the first successful animated television series by Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera. After making the transition from theatrical to television, Hanna-Barbera became synonymous with TV animation, and were the pioneers in the field.

 

Yogi and Boo Boo use a flying broom from a witch to steal picnic baskets.

First aired the week of January 18, 1960.

Yogi Bear began his long-lived cartoon career in his self-titled segment on “The Huckleberry Hound Show.” Later, this episode was repeated in Yogi’s spin-off show “The Yogi Bear Show” and shown with “Yakky Doodle“, and “Snagglepuss.”

Cartoon of the Day: The Missing Mouse

The Missing Mouse

The Missing Mouse

From nearly the end of the theatrical series, The Missing Mouse was unique in a few ways. Popular voice actor Paul Frees- Captain Hook from Disney’s Peter Pan from the same year- handles the voice duties for this short, and therein is one of the unique aspects of the film.

While Jerry is looting the fridge, Tom comes by and hammers him… He pinches Jerry’s tail in a mousetrap, and while running away, the mouse spills a bottle of white shoe polish on himself.

Suddenly, the radio blurts out that an experimental “explosive” white mouse has escaped from the lab. Tom sees Jerry and is frightened to death. Jerry takes advantage, and keeps trying to fall off shelves and such… the cat catching him no matter what. Tom lets irons and pianos fall on him instead of Jerry.

When the mouse falls in the sink, Tom realizes that he’s been a fool; he hits Jerry with a hammer and throws him out. The real white mouse then enters, and when Tom washes the fake one and then sees Jerry, he ages 50 years! The radio then announces that the explosive mouse is no longer dangerous… Tom strikes him and BOOM! The cat sticks his head out of the rubble and says, “Don’t you believe it!”

This is one of the rare cartoons in which Tom speaks; although here it sounds as though he is imitating character actor Ned Sparks in the final scene.

This is the only Tom and Jerry cartoon (and possibly the only MGM cartoon) for which Scott Bradley does not receive music credit.

 

 

Cartoon of the Day: Watch Out! The Willawaw!

Watch Out! The Willawaw!

Watch Out! The Willawaw!

The fifth incarnation of Scooby-Doo began on this date in 1978 with Watch Out! The Willawaw! from Scooby’s All-Stars. WHen the series started, no one thought it would go to five shows, much less the thirteen shows it has spawned to date. Five curious teens and their dog and going on almost 50 years.

Grey Fox perpetrates the legend of The Willawaw with a hot air balloon painted like The Willawaw to frighten people away from his smuggling operation. He kidnaps Velma’s Uncle Dave Dinkley, a lawman, when he gets too close to the operation. Red Heron, with the help of his friend Snapping Turtle, follows Grey Fox’s trail and releases their friend Dave, while Shaggy Scooby-Doo, Velma, Daphne and Fred capture Grey Fox and prove to the frightened Chippewas that the Willawaw is literally just a bag of hot air.
It all began in 1969 as Scooby-Doo, Where Are You? The traveling companion of four hep-cat teenagers, Scooby-Doo helped solved mysteries while simultaneously murdering the English language (though the fact that he could even speak should count for something). Scooby’s best friend was the skinny, goofy Shaggy, with whom he shared a love for Scooby snacks, among other delicacies. Also along for the ride was the much hunkier Freddy, the babeslicios Daphne, and Velma, the brainy girl who did most of the mystery cracking.

The inexplicable fivesome tooled around in the Mystery Machine (a groovy painted van), ending up in some pretty creepy towns menaced by ghosts, ghouls or mummies. Freddy would “take the girls,” leaving Scooby and Shaggy to fend for themselves, usually ending up in each other’s arms out of fear. After an extensive chase scene/musical sequence, the villain would be caught, reveal his true identity and curse those meddling kids for foiling his plans.

This incarnation lasted for two seasons before reruns took over. From 1972 to 1974, the show became The New Scooby-Doo Movies. This format had the kids meeting up with such guest stars as Mamma Cass, the Globetrotters, Sonny and Cher, and Don Knotts (all playing themselves) to solve more mysteries.

For one season in 1976, the gang became half of The Scooby-Doo/Dynomutt Show, sharing the bill with the “robonic” Dynomutt and his human superhero partner, The Blue Falcon. Scooby’s gang was joined by Scooby’s cousin Scooby-Dum, who (you guessed it) was dumb.

From ’76 to ’80, Scooby was granted ninety minutes under the title Scooby’s All-Star Laff-A-Lympics (later renamed Scooby’s All-Stars). This show featured a plethora of Hanna-Barbera characters—dating as far back as the 50′s—engaged in a variety of competitions.

In addition to rerunning Scooby-Doo, Where Are You? in 1978, ABC paired Laff-A-Lympics with a new show, Scooby and Scrappy-Doo. This show introduced Scoob’s short and confident nephew, who, though younger than Scooby, had much clearer speech. In 1980 the cowardly elder Doo was paired with a famous mini-millionaire in The Richie Rich/Scooby-Doo Show.

Scooby and Scrappy were still together in 1982, but now they split their time with another canine in The Scooby and Scrappy-Doo/Puppy’s New Adventures Hour. Joining these new shows were airings of reruns now called The Best of Scooby-Doo. In 1984 The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries (which brought back the teens as well as holding on to Scrappy) were aired, as were a bunch of reruns, this time called Scary Scooby Funnies.

In The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo (1985-86), Scooby, Scrappy, Shaggy and Daphne were joined by 9-year-old Flim Flam. The group, helped by warlock Vincent Van Ghoul (Vincent Price), fought off wicked sorcery. That season the Great Dane could also be seen in another rerun collection, Scooby’s Mystery FunHouse. In 1986 Scooby could only be seen in reruns of Laff-a-Lympics.

The airwaves were deprived of Scooby for two years. Then, in 1988, a new show called A Pup Named Scooby-Doo was produced. Like many cartoons of the time, this show took familiar characters back to their early years. Thus, Shaggy, Freddy, Velma and Daphne were now preteens. Scooby, of course, was but a pup. This version had the kids constantly running into the character Red Herring (wink, wink), whom the gang always suspected of committing crimes. This show ran in reruns until 1993, when it finally left network television.

And then, the Scooby dry spell. Ten years of now new Scoobs. OK, sure, we had the occasional direct-to-video releaese with the Mystery Crew, but no more reegular television. Ninally, in 2002, we got What’s New, Scooby-Doo?. This is also the first show since Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo to contain the gang in it’s original format: Fred, Daphne, Velma, Shaggy and Scooby-Doo.

Shaggy & Scooby-Doo Get a Clue! saw the first real redesign the crew has ever seen. The best way to describe the new look is to just avoid it altogether.

Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated is the most recent version of the show. Back to the original models (thanks GOD!). Fred, Daphne, Velma, Shaggy and their talking dog Scooby-Doo are back, solving mysteries in the spooky town of Crystal Cove, a sleepy coastal village that boasts a long history of ghostly sightings, werewolves and glowing deep sea divers.

It’s interesting to note that while the show itself underwent many changes, the characters did not. Aside from a modified Daphne appearing in The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo, the gang retained their late-sixties garb well into the eighties and nineties. This included knee-highs, a mini-skirt and lumpy turtleneck sweater for Velma, a rockin’ minidress and head scarf for Daphne, and groovy bell-bottoms for the guys. Scooby remained in his natural canine glory.

Scooby-Doo may have left Saturday morning, but his work is far from over. Scooby continues to answer the call, appearing semi-regularly in direct-to-video cartoon features. As long as mysteries need solving, Scooby-Doo will come through (and then he’ll have himself a Scooby Snack… that’s a fact).

 

Cartoon of the Day: A Flintstone Family Christmas

A Flintstone Family Christmas

A Flintstone Family Christmas

Time for a little reminder that it’s Christmastime, even in the stone age. Fred, Barney, Wilma and Betty all hang out for A Flintstone Family Christmas in this 1993 special.

The older generation Flintstones and Rubbles get involved with Stoney, a “caveless kid from the wrong side of the tar pits”, while awaiting the arrival of the newest members of the clan who were snowed in at O’Harestone Airport.

Cartoon of the Day: Go Away Ghost Ship

Go Away Ghost Ship

Go Away Ghost Ship

From the ORIGINAL Scooby-Doo series, Go Away Ghost Ship first aired on this date in 1969 on CBS-TV. When Frank Sinatra sang “Strangers in the Night,” did he know he would inspire the name for the longest-running cartoon on network TV? Probably not. Nonetheless, that Great Dane named Scooby-Doo (as in “dooby dooby doo”) has appeared on television under no less than twelve titles.

When the 300-year-old ghost of Redbeard The Pirate and his pirate ghost ship come out of a spooky night’s fog and raid a channel freighter, the reluctant Scooby-Doo and the teen sleuths find themselves in another baffling mystery. Pursuing the ghost ship, our kids’ boat is sliced in two, and Shag and Scooby are captured by pirates and made to cook dinner. The gang uncovers the Ghost Of Redbeard for what he really is: C.L. Magnus, the raided freighter’s owner who’d been raiding his own ships and selling the goods for the insurance money, and using an ancient revenge to cover up his scheme.

This story was adapted in Issue #6 (10252-106, June 1971) of Gold Key Comics’ Hanna-Barbera Scooby Doo, Where Are You! (“The Ghost Of Redbeard”).

And I woulda gotten away with it, too, if it wasn’t for those rascally kids…

Ken Walker, 91, was animator for Disney and H-B

Ken Walker

Ken Walker

Animator and director Kenneth David “Ken” Walker, whose work for Disney included such memorable films as Alice in Wonderland and Fantasia, died August 18 in Laguna Hills, California. He was 91.

A member of the Directors Guild of America, he worked for Disney from 1940-42 and 1945-52. He was filmed as one of Disney’s leading animators on the “Disney Cartoons” episode of You Asked For It, which can currently be seen on YouTube.

Walker also worked for many other notable companies, such as Columbia Pictures and Hanna-Barbera. He was the founder and sole owner of N.Y.C. Totem Productions from 1965 to 1971. In 1981, he founded Funnybone Films in Hollywood, California, where he remained owner for 20 years.

In TV, he animated Milton the Monster (1965), Bailey’s Comets (1973) and The Great Grape Ape Show (1977). He animated the ABC Afterschool Specials The Incredible, Indelible, Magical Physical, Mystery Trip (1973) and The Magical Mystery Trip Through Little Red’s Head (1974).

Walker animated the TV specials The Bear Who Slept Through Christmas (1973) and The Grinch Grinches the Cat in the Hat (1982), as well as the TV-movie Clerow Wilson’s Great Escape and The Mad Magazine TV Special, both made in 1974. He was a production designer for the 2000 special It’s the Pied Piper, Charlie Brown and a timing director for the 1994-94 series Skeleton Warriors.

He was a character animator for the 1982 H-B feature film Heidi’s Song and an animator for the 1992 hybrid movie Cool World. As well, he animated the theatrical 1974 short Trail of the Lonesome Pink and was animation director of the independent 1966 short Seeds of Discovery.

Born in Salt Lake City, Utah on May 4, 1921, Walker graduated from North Hollywood High School in the winter of 1940. He served in the United States Navy in the Pacific Theatre from 1942 to 1945.

Ken Walker was predeceased by his first wife, Sally Harriet (Sheppard) Walker, and second wife, Helen (Jacob) Walker.

He is survived by his wife, Carolyn Vera (Phillips) Walker; son Kenneth Alfred Walker of Murrieta, California; daughters Sue (Walker) Bingham of Veradale, Washington and Lynne Sperry (Walker) Bladergroen of Savannah, Georgia; brother George August Gewehr of Tucson, Arizona; grandchildren Glenn Michael Walker, Tiffany Cole Moss, Lindsey Suzanne (Bingham) Skinfill, Ian and Kyle Bladergroen; and great-grandchildren, Brooke and Tyler Walker, Gabriella Rae Skinfill and Aubrey Bladergroen.

A service will be held at 12:45 p.m. Monday August 27 at Riverside National Cemetery.

Big Mouse Take (1965) – Loopy de Loop Episode Guide

Big Mouse Take

Big Mouse Take

#CotD: From Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera first theatrical series on their own, “Big Mouse Take” was also their only theatrical series.

Big Mouse Take (1965) – Loopy de Loop Episode Guide

Loopy steps in for a cat to catch Bigelow the mouse.

You can watch “Big Mouse Take” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase