Tag Archives: Daffy Duck

Magician Mickey (1937) — Mickey Mouse Theatrical Cartoon Series

Magician Mickey (1937) - Mickey Mouse Theatrical

Magi­cian Mickey (1937) — Mickey Mouse Theatrical

CotD: David Hand directed Mickey Mouse in 1937’s “Magi­cian Mickey ” with his friends Don­ald Duck and Goofy. Watch it today for a laugh!

Magi­cian Mickey (1937) — Mickey Mouse The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Mickey is a stage magi­cian, and Goofy is a stage­hand. Don­ald is sit­ting in a box seat, and soon starts heck­ling. Mickey retal­i­ates, among other things by mak­ing him spit out play­ing cards, which only makes Don­ald more angry and deter­mined to heckle. Ulti­mately, Don­ald gets hold of Mickey’s flare gun and lit­er­ally brings the house down around the three of them.

Come see “Magi­cian Mickey ” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Mexican Joyride (1947) — Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Mexican Joyride (1947) - Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon

Mex­i­can Joyride (1947) — Looney Tunes The­atri­cal Cartoon


CotD: I can never pass up an Art Davis car­toon. “Mex­i­can Joyride” was spawned by a quick trip to Tijuana the crew took one weekend.

Mex­i­can Joyride (1947) — Looney Tunes The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Daffy Duck, singing “Gau­cho Ser­e­nade,” dri­ves down to Mex­ico for a vaca­tion. After a burn­ing expe­ri­ence with Mex­i­can food, Daffy takes in the bullfights.

As if at a base­ball game, Daffy heck­les the bull (“He’s blind as a bat! Throw the phony out!”). The bull chases the duck around the arena. Daffy tries the “Good Neigh­bor Pol­icy,” offer­ing the bull a “Cig­a­rette? Sparkling cham­pagne? A lit­tle gin rummy, per­haps?” Daffy pulls a hat trick, bet­ting the bull to guess what som­brero he’s hid­ing under. When the bull guesses wrong, he cries over los­ing his money. Daffy vol­un­teers weapons to help him com­mit suicide.

The bull chases the duck with a machine gun into town, where the duck packs his bags and dri­ves home, unaware that the bull is in the back seat.

Watch “Mex­i­can Joyride” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Daffy-The Commando (1943) — Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Daffy-The Commando (1943) - Looney Tunes

Daffy-The Com­mando (1943) — Looney Tunes

CotD: One of the fun­ni­est war car­toons from any stu­dio, “Daffy-The Com­mando” fea­tures Daffy tak­ing on– and beat­ing!- Hitler.

Daffy-The Com­mando (1943) — Looney Tunes The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Daffy is a com­mando who para­chutes down into the Ger­man trenches to raise hell. Daffy bedev­ils the Ger­man com­man­der, Von Vul­ture, and his side­kick, lit­tle helmet-with-two-feet Schultz, pro­vid­ing plenty of oppor­tu­ni­ties for anti-Nazi jokes along the way.

After work­ing his mis­chief, Daffy tries to escape in a plane, but is sur­rounded by “a mess of Messer­schmidts” which shoot each other out of the sky after Daffy gets out of the way. Von Vul­ture blows Daffy’s plane to bits with a machine gun, and the com­mando is forced to flee on foot.

He hides in a dark tun­nel, which turns out to be the bar­rel of a long-range can­non. Daffy is shot out of it and lands in Berlin, where Adolf Hitler is shrilly harangu­ing a crowd.

Daffy has the honor of clob­ber­ing the Fuhrer him­self with a mallet.

Watch “Daffy-The Com­mando ” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

1001 Rabbit Tales (1983) — Warner Bros. Feature Film

1001 Rabbit Tales (1983) - Warner Bros. Feature Film

1001 Rab­bit Tales (1983) — Warner Bros. Fea­ture Film

CotD: Third in a series of 1980’s Looney Tunes revival films, “1001 Rab­bit Tales” fea­tures Bugs and Daffy com­pet­ing against each other.

1001 Rab­bit Tales (1983) — Warner Bros. Fea­ture Film

Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny are rival sales­man for the “Ram­blin House Pub­lish­ing Com­pany,” and are in fierce com­pe­ti­tion over who can sell the most books. They devise a plan to travel the world to outdo each other– and the laughs pile up with adven­ture along the way, fea­tur­ing clas­sic Warner Broth­ers moments from the past. When Bugs encoun­ters Sul­tan Sam’s bratty Prince Abad­aba, he’s forced to read him 1,001 tales to save his skin.

Watch “1001 Rab­bit Tales ” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Show Biz Bugs (1957) — Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Show Biz Bugs (1957) - Looney Tunes

Show Biz Bugs (1957) — Looney Tunes

CotD: In “Show Biz Bugs” we learned that the only prob­lem with a great trick like Daffy’s is that you can only do it once.

Show Biz Bugs (1957) — Looney Tunes The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Bugs and Daffy put on a vaude­ville show. While Bugs is effort­less, Daffy has to work hard to get any respect: “What, that rabbit’s name over mine?” Daffy com­petes with Bugs for the audience’s approval in many vaude­ville acts, includ­ing danc­ing, per­form­ing music and magic tricks. Even “Daffy Duck and his Trained Pigeons” make an appearance.

Watch “Show Biz Bugs ” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Duck! Rabbit, Duck! (1931) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Duck! Rabbit, Duck! (1931) - Merrie Melodies

Duck! Rab­bit, Duck! (1931) — Mer­rie Melodies

CotD: The final entry in the three car­toon series, “Duck! Rab­bit, Duck!” we ulti­mately dis­cover its Base­ball season…

Duck! Rab­bit, Duck! (1931) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Daffy and Bugs bat­tle each other as they bat­tle Elmer.

Watch “Duck! Rab­bit, Duck!” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Rabbit Seasoning (1952) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical Cartoon Series

Rabbit Seasoning (1952) - Merrie Melodies

Rab­bit Sea­son­ing (1952) — Mer­rie Melodies

CotD: The sec­ond of three in the series, “Rab­bit Sea­son­ing” Bugs and Daffy still can’t decide if it’s rab­bit or duck season…

Rab­bit Sea­son­ing (1952) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Daffy tries to match wits with Bugs as they debate whether it’s rab­bit sea­son or duck sea­son (Daffy uses his own ver­sion of Burma-Shave signs at the out­set). Elmer is totally wit­less in the exchange. .

Watch “Rab­bit Sea­son­ing” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Scrap Happy Daffy (1943) — Looney Tunes Theatrical Cartoon Series

Scrap Happy Daffy (1943) - Looney Tunes

Scrap Happy Daffy (1943) — Looney Tunes

CotD: You gotta love the Looney Toons with Adolf in them; “Scrap Happy Daffy” was also Daffy Duck’s last appear­ance in black and white ~

Scrap Happy Daffy (1943) — Looney Tunes The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Daffy as Super Duck in the War for Scrap against the Nazis. Air raid war­den Daffy defends his scrap yard from attack after Adolf Hitler per­son­ally orders its destruc­tion. Sub­marines and Nazi goats are no match for Daffy. After receiv­ing inspi­ra­tion from his ducky ances­tors, Daffy turns into Super-Duck.

Watch “Scrap Happy Daffy” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Slightly Daffy (1944) — Merrie Melodies Theatrical

CotD: 1944’s “Slightly Daffy” was a color remake of 1938’s Scalp_Trouble

Slightly Daffy (1944) - Merrie Melodies

Slightly Daffy (1944) — Mer­rie Melodies

Slightly Daffy (1944) — Mer­rie Melodies The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Daffy com­mands a lonely cav­alry out­post in the old West. He and Gen­eral Porky hold the fort.

Watch Slightly Daffy at Big Car­toon DataBase

Looney Tunes and Mel Blanc return to movie screen

Daffy's Rhapsody

Daffy’s Rhap­sody

Thuf­ferin thuc­co­tash!” Sylvester the Cat, Tweety Bird, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, Wile E. Coy­ote and the Road Run­ner will all return to the­aters in three orig­i­nal Looney Tunes 3D the­atri­cal car­toon shorts pro­duced by Warner Bros. Ani­ma­tion and directed by Matthew O’Callaghan (Coy­ote Falls).

Two of the new shorts — Daffy’s Rhap­sody and I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat – will fea­ture the voice of the late, great Mel Blanc. The leg­endary actor/comedian known as The Man of a Thou­sand Voices brought to life some of the most revered char­ac­ters in ani­ma­tion his­tory dur­ing a cel­e­brated career span­ning six decades. Blanc will appear in the shorts — which are cre­ated using state-of-the-art CG ani­ma­tion and ren­dered in stereo­scopic 3D — via orig­i­nal songs he recorded in char­ac­ter in the 1950s.

The announce­ment was made Wednes­day by Warner Bros. Tele­vi­sion pres­i­dent Peter Roth, who over­sees tele­vi­sion ani­ma­tion for the stu­dio, and Sam Reg­is­ter, Warner Bros. Animation’s exec­u­tive vice-president for cre­ative affairs. Reg­is­ter unveiled news of the three orig­i­nal shorts — which also include an as-yet-untitled adven­ture fea­tur­ing the Coy­ote and Road Run­ner — dur­ing a pre­sen­ta­tion at the Annecy Inter­na­tional Ani­mated Film Festival.

Every­one at Warner Bros. Ani­ma­tion grew up lov­ing the Looney Tunes char­ac­ters, and it has been both a great honor and an enor­mous chal­lenge to con­tinue the legacy of these ani­ma­tion icons and intro­duce them to a new gen­er­a­tion of fans,” said Reg­is­ter. “And to have the incom­pa­ra­ble Mel Blanc voic­ing these char­ac­ters once more is noth­ing short of a dream come true for all of us.”

Reg­is­ter added, “This will prob­a­bly be the last time that Looney Tunes fans will have an oppor­tu­nity to see an orig­i­nal Mel Blanc short fea­tur­ing these char­ac­ters. We are hon­ored to bring Mr. Blanc and his legacy to Looney Tunes fans once again.”

Daffy’s Rhap­sody is the first of the new shorts. In it, a per­sis­tent Elmer Fudd chases Daffy Duck (Blanc) on stage dur­ing a musi­cal per­for­mance. The short fea­tures Blanc per­form­ing the song “Daffy Duck’s Rhap­sody.” Daffy’s Rhap­sody is sched­uled to debut in the­aters Novem­ber 18 in con­junc­tion with Warner Bros. Pic­tures’ release of Happy Feet 2.

In I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat, a clas­sic game of cat and bird tran­spires in Granny’s apart­ment as Tweety Bird goes to great lengths to avoid the clutches of his arch-nemesis Sylvester the Cat. The short also fea­tures the hit song of the same name, which was per­formed by Blanc, and which sold over three mil­lion copies worldwide.

Wile E. Coyote’s epic quest to cap­ture the Road Run­ner con­tin­ues in an all-new, unti­tled Coy­ote and Road Run­ner short. Will the Coy­ote finally get his paws on his elu­sive prize?

The three new shorts are all directed by O’Callaghan and exec­u­tive pro­duced by Reg­is­ter (The Looney Tunes Show, Teen Titans, Ben 10). The pro­duc­ers are Spike Brandt and Tony Cer­vone (both of The Looney Tunes Show and Duck Dodgers).

In 2010, Warner Bros. Ani­ma­tion unveiled its first three CG car­toon shorts, all of which fea­tured Wile E. Coy­ote and Road Run­ner. The first, Coy­ote Falls, was short­listed for the Acad­emy Award for Best Short Film (Ani­mated), and was nom­i­nated for an Annie Award for Best Ani­mated Short Subject.