Tag Archives: Betty Boop

Betty In Blunderland (1934) — Betty Boop Cartoon Series

Betty In Blunderland

Betty In Blunderland

CotD: Babe Ruth makes a cameo appear­ance as Twee­dle­dum and Twee­dledee in “Betty In Blun­der­land”. Also look for Ed Wynn in this short.

Betty In Blun­der­land (1934) — Betty Boop Car­toon Series

Betty Boop falls asleep while work­ing on a jig­saw puz­zle of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Won­der­land” char­ac­ters. The White Rab­bit in the puz­zle comes to life, and Betty fol­lows him through the mir­ror (a.k.a. look­ing glass) into Blun­der­land, which is just like Won­der­land, except that it has sub­way stations.

She finds her­self in front of a minia­ture sub­way kiosk, through which the rab­bit has passed. She wig­gles through and falls down a long well, and crawls through a tun­nel, find­ing her­self in a room where char­ac­ters make them­selves small by drink­ing Shrink-ola.

Betty drinks some her­self, and shrinks to being small enough to pass through a tiny exit. She meets up with the Car­pen­ter and the Wal­rus, Twee­dledee and Twee­dle­dum, the Mad Hat­ter, the White Rab­bit and the Queen of Hearts.

After all the inhab­i­tants of Blun­der­land emerge from the Mad Hatter’s hat, Betty greets them in song (“How Do You Do”) while they engage in var­i­ous spot gags. Sud­denly, the mon­strous Jab­ber­wock flows out of the Mad Hatter’s hat and car­ries Betty off; the Blun­der­lan­di­ans give chase in an attempt to res­cue her.

The mon­ster drops Betty over a cliff and she lands, sur­rounded by the Car­roll char­ac­ters. After the entire com­pany gets pitched over a cliff, Betty wakes up. She catches the White Rab­bit and puts him back in the puz­zle, where he belongs.

Come see “Betty In Blun­der­land” on video at Big Car­toon DataBa

Minnie The Moocher (1932) — Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon Series

Minnie The Moocher (1932)

Min­nie The Moocher (1932)

CotD: Cab Calloway’s first appear­ance in a Betty Boop car­toon was in 1932’s “Min­nie The Moocher” which begins with actual film footage of Cab Cal­loway danc­ing in front of his orchestra.

Min­nie The Moocher (1932) — Talka­r­toons The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

The film opens with live-action footage of Cab Calloway’s Orches­tra. Cab is strut­ting his famous dance moves. Fed up with her par­ents’ nag­ging, Betty has a fight with her stern Ger­man father. Her father nags so much that his head turns into a talk­ing machine. She resolves to run away with Bimbo.

They’re in the woods when the sun goes down. It’s really spooky. Sud­denly, a ghostly wal­rus appears and begins to sing “Min­nie the Moocher.” The ghost wal­rus’ move­ments were traced from a live-action film of Calloway’s danc­ing. The wal­rus has all of Cab’s patented moves.

All of the ghosts and gob­lins in the cave dig the wal­rus’ music. There are spooks every­where! Betty and Bimbo run home. Betty’s glad to be in her nice, safe bed.

Come see “Min­nie The Moocher” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Is My Palm Read (1933) — Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Is My Palm Read Betty Boop Cartoon

Is My Palm Read Betty Boop Cartoon

CotD: A great exam­ple of how racy a pre-Hayes Code short could be, “Is My Palm Read” fea­tures Betty Boop in her birth­day suit. Don’t believe us– watch it.

Is My Palm Read (1933) — Betty Boop The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Bimbo the fortune-teller tries to score with Betty Boop. As she enters the house, the lights are changed so as to see Betty’s sil­hou­ette through her dress, upon which Bimbo and Koko remark “Hi-dee-ho!”

In his crys­tal ball, Bimbo shows Betty “the gone-by days of your naked youth,” bring­ing up a scene of a very young (and nude!) Betty tak­ing a bath. Then the crys­tal ball reveals Betty cast adrift on the ocean, and land­ing on a haunted jun­gle island, where she removes her wet clothes, loses them, and finds tree leaves to cover her­self. Bimbo con­jures up a “for­tune” in which he res­cues the ship­wrecked Betty. “My hero!” squeaks Betty… but Bimbo turns out to be a bet­ter prophet than he thought, as an unsa­vory group of ghosts boil out of the crys­tal ball and chase Betty and Bimbo through a jun­gle that appears out of nowhere.

The pair finally evade their pur­suers through one of the ear­li­est uses of the old “hol­low log over the cliff” trick (these appar­ently being the world’s least buoy­ant ghosts).

Come see “Is My Palm Read” on video at Big Car­toon DataBase

Pudgy The Watchman (1938) — Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Pudgy The Watchman (1938)

Pudgy The Watch­man (1938)

CotD: Post-code Betty Boop The­atri­cal Car­toons like “Pudgy The Watch­man” is not as sexy as the ear­lier shorts, but can be a lot of fun ~ http://www.bcdb.com/cartoon/1654-Pudgy_The_Watchman.html

Pudgy The Watch­man (1938) — Betty Boop The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Betty is conned into hir­ing Al E. Katz, a crooked cat, to solve her rodent woes because Pudgy isn’t doing his job. A tra­di­tional mean cat-vs.-cute mice strug­gle ensues. At one point, the cat shel­lacs the tails of the mice, throw­ing the rodents back­wards at a beach umbrella in a home­made dart game. Even­tu­ally, the feline shys­ter drinks a cask of cider in the cel­lar and gets sloshed. When the mice lead him on a chase back upstairs, Betty’s relieved to have Pudgy throw Katz out the window.

Watch Pudgy The Watch­man at Big Car­toon DataBase

Silly Scandals (1931) — Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: “Silly Scan­dals” was the first car­toon fea­tur­ing a named Betty Boop, who still has her puppy dog ears. ~

Silly Scandals (1931) - Talkartoons

Silly Scan­dals (1931) — Talkartoons

Silly Scan­dals (1931) — Talka­r­toons The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Bimbo is try­ing to get in to see a the­ater stage show. Because he has no money, Bimbo tries var­i­ous dodges to sneak into the the­ater, and even­tu­ally suc­ceeds. A stan­dard set of Fleis­cher audi­ence gags fol­lows: First, Bimbo can’t see because he is behind a large hip­popota­mus who always shifts to block Bimbo’s view; the hippo is replaced by a woman with a big hat.

When she removes the hat, she has an even big­ger hairdo under­neath. Bimbo cuts off her hair, and finally, he can see the stage. The crowd cheers Betty by name when she comes on stage. She has dog ears, a white nose, lots of curls and an enor­mous head.

Watch Silly Scan­dals at Big Car­toon DataBase

Betty Boop’s May Party (1933) — Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: Going way back to the Fleis­cher period and 1933 with “Betty Boop’s May Party”; come along, you’re invited ~

Betty Boop's May Party (1933) - Betty Boop Theatrical

Betty Boop’s May Party (1933) — Betty Boop Theatrical

Betty Boop’s May Party (1933) — Betty Boop The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

When an ele­phant punc­tures a rub­ber tree, he gets Betty– and the whole town– bouncing.

Watch Betty Boop’s May Party at Big Car­toon DataBase

Betty In Blunderland (1934) — Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: Betty falls through the look­ing glass in 1934’s “Betty In Blunderland”

Betty In Blunderland

Betty In Blunderland

Betty In Blun­der­land (1934) — Betty Boop The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Betty Boop falls asleep while work­ing on a jig­saw puz­zle of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Won­der­land” char­ac­ters. The White Rab­bit in the puz­zle comes to life, and Betty fol­lows him through the mir­ror (a.k.a. look­ing glass) into Blun­der­land, which is just like Won­der­land, except that it has sub­way sta­tions. She finds her­self in front of a minia­ture sub­way kiosk, through which the rab­bit has passed.

She wig­gles through and falls down a long well, and crawls through a tun­nel, find­ing her­self in a room where char­ac­ters make them­selves small by drink­ing Shrink-ola. Betty drinks some her­self, and shrinks to being small enough to pass through a tiny exit. She meets up with the Car­pen­ter and the Wal­rus, Twee­dledee and Twee­dle­dum, the Mad Hat­ter, the White Rab­bit and the Queen of Hearts.

After all the inhab­i­tants of Blun­der­land emerge from the Mad Hatter’s hat, Betty greets them in song (“How Do You Do”) while they engage in var­i­ous spot gags. Sud­denly, the mon­strous Jab­ber­wock flows out of the Mad Hatter’s hat and car­ries Betty off; the Blun­der­lan­di­ans give chase in an attempt to res­cue her. The mon­ster drops Betty over a cliff and she lands, sur­rounded by the Car­roll char­ac­ters. After the entire com­pany gets pitched over a cliff, Betty wakes up. She catches the White Rab­bit and puts him back in the puz­zle, where he belongs.

Watch Betty In Blun­der­land at Big Car­toon DataBase

Crazy Town (1932) — Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon

CotD: Here comes Betty Boop and Koko in “Crazy Town” from 1932; watch it today and tell us what you think of Betty!

Crazy Town (1932) - Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon

Crazy Town (1932) — Talka­r­toons The­atri­cal Cartoon

Crazy Town (1932) — Talka­r­toons The­atri­cal Cartoon

Betty Boop and Bimbo take a street­car ride to Crazy Town for a lit­tle vaca­tion, a city where every­thing is upside-down: fishes are fly­ing, birds are swim­ming, mice are roar­ing, the lions crow like roost­ers… Sud­denly, a piano grows out of the ground, and Betty and Bimbo per­form for all the town’s animals.

Watch Crazy Town on Video Here

No Boop for you, Fleischer family

Betty Boop

Betty Boop

Betty Boop mer­chan­dis­ing, the Ninth U.S. Cir­cuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday.

The court ruled in a 2–1 deci­sion that the chain of title had been bro­ken after the orig­i­nal sale of the rights to Betty over 70 years ago. In essence, it said, Fleischer’s fam­ily lacks a valid copy­right or trade­mark for Betty.

A 1930 court opin­ion said that Fleis­cher cre­ated the appeal­ing female who “com­bined in appear­ance the child­ish with the sophis­ti­cated — a large round baby face with big eyes and a nose like a but­ton, framed in a some­what care­ful coif­fure, with a very small body.”

In 1941, Fleis­cher trans­ferred the rights to Betty Boop’s image and car­toons to Para­mount Pic­tures Inc. Accord­ing to the fam­ily, the rights were trans­ferred sev­eral more times before they reverted to the fam­ily through their firm, Fleis­cher Stu­dios Inc.

After­ward, the fam­ily started to license Ms. Boop for use in mer­chan­dise. A.V.E.L.A. Inc., a com­pany which licenses images of the char­ac­ter, were sued by the fam­ily for copy­right infringement.

More at The Big Car­toon Forum

Is My Palm Read (1933) — Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: Everybody’s favorite bimbo Betty Boop appeared in “Is My Palm Read” in 1933 
Is My Palm Read (1933) - Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Is My Palm Read (1933) — Betty Boop The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Is My Palm Read (1933) — from the Betty Boop The­atri­cal Car­toon Series

Is My Palm Read: Bimbo the fortune-teller tries to score with Betty Boop. As she enters the house, the lights are changed so as to see Betty’s sil­hou­ette through her dress, upon which Bimbo and Koko remark Hi-dee-ho.