Tag Archives: Betty Boop

Betty In Blunderland (1934) – Betty Boop Cartoon Series

Betty In Blunderland

Betty In Blunderland

CotD: Babe Ruth makes a cameo appearance as Tweedledum and Tweedledee in “Betty In Blunderland“. Also look for Ed Wynn in this short.

Betty In Blunderland (1934) – Betty Boop Cartoon Series

Betty Boop falls asleep while working on a jigsaw puzzle of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland” characters. The White Rabbit in the puzzle comes to life, and Betty follows him through the mirror (a.k.a. looking glass) into Blunderland, which is just like Wonderland, except that it has subway stations.

She finds herself in front of a miniature subway kiosk, through which the rabbit has passed. She wiggles through and falls down a long well, and crawls through a tunnel, finding herself in a room where characters make themselves small by drinking Shrink-ola.

Betty drinks some herself, and shrinks to being small enough to pass through a tiny exit. She meets up with the Carpenter and the Walrus, Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the Mad Hatter, the White Rabbit and the Queen of Hearts.

After all the inhabitants of Blunderland emerge from the Mad Hatter’s hat, Betty greets them in song (“How Do You Do”) while they engage in various spot gags. Suddenly, the monstrous Jabberwock flows out of the Mad Hatter’s hat and carries Betty off; the Blunderlandians give chase in an attempt to rescue her.

The monster drops Betty over a cliff and she lands, surrounded by the Carroll characters. After the entire company gets pitched over a cliff, Betty wakes up. She catches the White Rabbit and puts him back in the puzzle, where he belongs.

Come see “Betty In Blunderland” on video at Big Cartoon DataBa

Minnie The Moocher (1932) – Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon Series

Minnie The Moocher (1932)

Minnie The Moocher (1932)

CotD: Cab Calloway’s first appearance in a Betty Boop cartoon was in 1932’s “Minnie The Moocher” which begins with actual film footage of Cab Calloway dancing in front of his orchestra.

Minnie The Moocher (1932) – Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon Series

The film opens with live-action footage of Cab Calloway’s Orchestra. Cab is strutting his famous dance moves. Fed up with her parents’ nagging, Betty has a fight with her stern German father. Her father nags so much that his head turns into a talking machine. She resolves to run away with Bimbo.

They’re in the woods when the sun goes down. It’s really spooky. Suddenly, a ghostly walrus appears and begins to sing “Minnie the Moocher.” The ghost walrus’ movements were traced from a live-action film of Calloway’s dancing. The walrus has all of Cab’s patented moves.

All of the ghosts and goblins in the cave dig the walrus’ music. There are spooks everywhere! Betty and Bimbo run home. Betty’s glad to be in her nice, safe bed.

Come see “Minnie The Moocher” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Is My Palm Read (1933) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Is My Palm Read Betty Boop Cartoon

Is My Palm Read Betty Boop Cartoon

CotD: A great example of how racy a pre-Hayes Code short could be, “Is My Palm Read” features Betty Boop in her birthday suit. Don’t believe us- watch it.

Is My Palm Read (1933) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bimbo the fortune-teller tries to score with Betty Boop. As she enters the house, the lights are changed so as to see Betty’s silhouette through her dress, upon which Bimbo and Koko remark “Hi-dee-ho!”

In his crystal ball, Bimbo shows Betty “the gone-by days of your naked youth,” bringing up a scene of a very young (and nude!) Betty taking a bath. Then the crystal ball reveals Betty cast adrift on the ocean, and landing on a haunted jungle island, where she removes her wet clothes, loses them, and finds tree leaves to cover herself. Bimbo conjures up a “fortune” in which he rescues the shipwrecked Betty. “My hero!” squeaks Betty… but Bimbo turns out to be a better prophet than he thought, as an unsavory group of ghosts boil out of the crystal ball and chase Betty and Bimbo through a jungle that appears out of nowhere.

The pair finally evade their pursuers through one of the earliest uses of the old “hollow log over the cliff” trick (these apparently being the world’s least buoyant ghosts).

Come see “Is My Palm Read” on video at Big Cartoon DataBase

Pudgy The Watchman (1938) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Pudgy The Watchman (1938)

Pudgy The Watchman (1938)

CotD: Post-code Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoons like “Pudgy The Watchman” is not as sexy as the earlier shorts, but can be a lot of fun ~ http://www.bcdb.com/cartoon/1654-Pudgy_The_Watchman.html

Pudgy The Watchman (1938) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Betty is conned into hiring Al E. Katz, a crooked cat, to solve her rodent woes because Pudgy isn’t doing his job. A traditional mean cat-vs.-cute mice struggle ensues. At one point, the cat shellacs the tails of the mice, throwing the rodents backwards at a beach umbrella in a homemade dart game. Eventually, the feline shyster drinks a cask of cider in the cellar and gets sloshed. When the mice lead him on a chase back upstairs, Betty’s relieved to have Pudgy throw Katz out the window.

Watch Pudgy The Watchman at Big Cartoon DataBase

Silly Scandals (1931) – Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: “Silly Scandals” was the first cartoon featuring a named Betty Boop, who still has her puppy dog ears. ~

Silly Scandals (1931) - Talkartoons

Silly Scandals (1931) - Talkartoons

Silly Scandals (1931) – Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon Series

Bimbo is trying to get in to see a theater stage show. Because he has no money, Bimbo tries various dodges to sneak into the theater, and eventually succeeds. A standard set of Fleischer audience gags follows: First, Bimbo can’t see because he is behind a large hippopotamus who always shifts to block Bimbo’s view; the hippo is replaced by a woman with a big hat.

When she removes the hat, she has an even bigger hairdo underneath. Bimbo cuts off her hair, and finally, he can see the stage. The crowd cheers Betty by name when she comes on stage. She has dog ears, a white nose, lots of curls and an enormous head.

Watch Silly Scandals at Big Cartoon DataBase

Betty Boop’s May Party (1933) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: Going way back to the Fleischer period and 1933 with “Betty Boop’s May Party”; come along, you’re invited ~

Betty Boop's May Party (1933) - Betty Boop Theatrical

Betty Boop's May Party (1933) - Betty Boop Theatrical

Betty Boop’s May Party (1933) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

When an elephant punctures a rubber tree, he gets Betty- and the whole town- bouncing.

Watch Betty Boop’s May Party at Big Cartoon DataBase

Betty In Blunderland (1934) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: Betty falls through the looking glass in 1934’s “Betty In Blunderland”

Betty In Blunderland

Betty In Blunderland

Betty In Blunderland (1934) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Betty Boop falls asleep while working on a jigsaw puzzle of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland” characters. The White Rabbit in the puzzle comes to life, and Betty follows him through the mirror (a.k.a. looking glass) into Blunderland, which is just like Wonderland, except that it has subway stations. She finds herself in front of a miniature subway kiosk, through which the rabbit has passed.

She wiggles through and falls down a long well, and crawls through a tunnel, finding herself in a room where characters make themselves small by drinking Shrink-ola. Betty drinks some herself, and shrinks to being small enough to pass through a tiny exit. She meets up with the Carpenter and the Walrus, Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the Mad Hatter, the White Rabbit and the Queen of Hearts.

After all the inhabitants of Blunderland emerge from the Mad Hatter’s hat, Betty greets them in song (“How Do You Do”) while they engage in various spot gags. Suddenly, the monstrous Jabberwock flows out of the Mad Hatter’s hat and carries Betty off; the Blunderlandians give chase in an attempt to rescue her. The monster drops Betty over a cliff and she lands, surrounded by the Carroll characters. After the entire company gets pitched over a cliff, Betty wakes up. She catches the White Rabbit and puts him back in the puzzle, where he belongs.

Watch Betty In Blunderland at Big Cartoon DataBase

Crazy Town (1932) – Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon

CotD: Here comes Betty Boop and Koko in “Crazy Town” from 1932; watch it today and tell us what you think of Betty!

Crazy Town (1932) - Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon

Crazy Town (1932) - Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon

Crazy Town (1932) – Talkartoons Theatrical Cartoon

Betty Boop and Bimbo take a streetcar ride to Crazy Town for a little vacation, a city where everything is upside-down: fishes are flying, birds are swimming, mice are roaring, the lions crow like roosters… Suddenly, a piano grows out of the ground, and Betty and Bimbo perform for all the town’s animals.

Watch Crazy Town on Video Here

No Boop for you, Fleischer family

Betty Boop

Betty Boop

Betty Boop merchandising, the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday.

The court ruled in a 2-1 decision that the chain of title had been broken after the original sale of the rights to Betty over 70 years ago. In essence, it said, Fleischer’s family lacks a valid copyright or trademark for Betty.

A 1930 court opinion said that Fleischer created the appealing female who “combined in appearance the childish with the sophisticated — a large round baby face with big eyes and a nose like a button, framed in a somewhat careful coiffure, with a very small body.”

In 1941, Fleischer transferred the rights to Betty Boop’s image and cartoons to Paramount Pictures Inc. According to the family, the rights were transferred several more times before they reverted to the family through their firm, Fleischer Studios Inc.

Afterward, the family started to license Ms. Boop for use in merchandise. A.V.E.L.A. Inc., a company which licenses images of the character, were sued by the family for copyright infringement.

More at The Big Cartoon Forum

Is My Palm Read (1933) – Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

CotD: Everybody’s favorite bimbo Betty Boop appeared in “Is My Palm Read” in 1933 
Is My Palm Read (1933) - Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Is My Palm Read (1933) - Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Is My Palm Read (1933) – from the Betty Boop Theatrical Cartoon Series

Is My Palm Read: Bimbo the fortune-teller tries to score with Betty Boop. As she enters the house, the lights are changed so as to see Betty’s silhouette through her dress, upon which Bimbo and Koko remark Hi-dee-ho.