Monthly Archives: November 2012

Disney’s John Carter Remains in VFX Oscar Race

John Carter

John Carter

Disney’s disastrous hybrid “John Carter” is one of 10 films which remain in the running in the Visual Effects category for the 85th Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Friday.

Combining CGI animation and live action, John Carter was released March 9. The major money-loser was originally conceived as a live-action film by Brad Bird. Explored as a trilogy of films, this first film was based on just the first Edgar Rice Burroughs novel.

Other films on the shortlist for the Visual Effects category of the Oscars are The Amazing Spider-Man, Cloud Atlas, The Dark Knight Rises, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Life of Pi, Marvel’s The Avengers, Prometheus, Skyfall and Snow White and the Huntsman.

All members of the Academy’s Visual Effects Branch will be invited to view 10-minute excerpts from each of the 10 shortlisted films on Thursday, January 3. Following the screenings, the members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar consideration.

The 85th Academy Awards nominations will be announced live Thursday, January 10 at 5:30 a.m. PT in the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater.

Academy Awards for outstanding film achievements of 2012 will be presented Sunday, February 24 at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center, and televised live on ABC. The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in over 225 countries worldwide.

Bah, Humbug: SpongeBob Banned From Xmas Lighting

SpongeBob SquarePants

SpongeBob SquarePants

Bureaucrats in Wolverhampton, England refused to let SpongeBob Squarepants go on stage for the city’s Christmas lights turn-on ceremony because it was felt that his costume was to large for him to climb five steps to the platform.

Health and safety concerns also stopped him from being lifted onto the back of a float due to the crowd of 2,000 — including many families with young children — that showed up to see the cartoon character. That means SpongeBob couldn’t be carried around town.

Many young fans couldn’t see him Friday night because the children’s character could only be on ground level.

However, the yellow guy was allowed to meet and greet fans in Beatties and Market Square. Health and safety rules meant that he could spend just two 40-minute sessions with fans.

Bringing SpongeBob to the big event cost £1,845 ($3,000 U.S.).

John Williamson, 45, of Wolverhampton said that his nine-year-old daughter Lola was left in tears after she couldn’t see her idol.

Bah, Humbug: SpongeBob Banned From Xmas Lighting

Bah, Humbug: SpongeBob Banned From Xmas Lighting

“It’s ridiculous to ban a children’s character from a Christmas lights switch on,” he fumed. “You would hope the council wouldn’t be such health and safety scrooges and let the kids have a good look at their character.

“Lola had been talking about seeing Spongebob Squarepants for days, but was inconsolable when she couldn’t even get a glimpse of him.”

SpongeBob had been expected to turn the lights on alongside Coronation Street star Sherrie Hewson, but the soap opera star had to press the button by herself.

Wolverhampton City Council leaders called last week’s event a success.

“The Christmas lights switch-on was a great success, with huge crowds turning up to Market Square to enjoy the free event,” said Mark Blackstock, the council’s outdoor events manager. “Unfortunately, the character actor playing SpongeBob Squarepants was unable to climb the stairs on to the stage because of his costume.

“Health and safety considerations meant we were unable to lift him on to the stage using the tailgate of one of our vehicles because of the high numbers of people around the stage.

“This meant that SpongeBob Squarepants was unable to appear on stage during the event. But he did spend an hour and 20 minutes meeting fans both in Market Square and Beatties House of Fraser.

“As the actor could only be permitted to stay in his suit for 40 minutes at a time, again for health and safety reasons, we arranged the two 40-minute meet and greet sessions to enable the public to see him close up.

“During this time, he met as many young fans as possible at both locations, though we of course apologise to anyone who couldn’t see him on stage and was unable to meet him in person.”

Ten-year-old Jessica Drew, a pupil of Woodfield Junior School in Penn, joined her Girl Guide group to watch the lighting ceremony.

“The fireworks were really good and we enjoyed it, but we were disappointed that we didn’t see SpongeBob. We just thought that he hadn’t turned up because we never saw him once. There was no sign of him on stage at all,” she remarked.

Just two years ago, another costumed cartoon character let fans down at the city’s Christmas lights bash. Peppa Pig had to cut down on her meet-and-greets over concerns that she would overheat in her suit. The woman in the suit cut short the visit herself, saying that she had gone over her time limit in the costume.

Beatties staff offered to wear the suit themselves to prevent children and parents from being disappointed children and parents. However, they were told that they couldn’t take on Peppa’s role. At the time, Beatties said the meet-and-greet had lasted longer than expected in spite of health and safety rules.

Jennifer Lee joins Chris Buck to direct Disney’s Frozen

Frozen

Frozen

Walt Disney Animation Studios announced Thursday that it has tapped Jennifer Lee to join Chris Buck at the helm of its 53rd full-length animated feature, Frozen, which is slated for the big screen on November 27, 2013.

Lee, who has contributed to the film’s screenplay, is one of the screenplay writers of this year’s arcade-hopping adventure Wreck-It Ralph.

The comedy-adventure Frozen features the voices of Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel.

When a prophecy traps a kingdom in eternal winter, Anna, a fearless optimist, teams up with extreme mountain man Kristoff and his sidekick reindeer Sven on an epic journey to find Anna’s sister Elsa, the Snow Queen, and put an end to her icy spell. Encountering mystical trolls, a funny snowman named Olaf, Everest-like extremes and magic at every turn, Anna and Kristoff battle the elements in a race to save the kingdom from destruction.

Frozen producer Peter Del Vecho says that the match-up is perfect: “Jenn has a real connection to the film and creates dynamic and relatable characters. Her sense of comedy, adventure and story structure, paired with Chris Buck’s vast experience and incredible instincts, create an ideal situation for this film.”

Lee’s screen adaptation of John Steinbeck’s The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights is being produced by Troika Pictures. She has an original screenplay in development with Leonardo DiCaprio’s Appian Way, and her original script Lucid Dreams was optioned by Wolfgang Peterson’s Radiant Productions. Lee holds an MFA in Film from Columbia University and a BA in English from the University of New Hampshire.

Buck directed (with Kevin Lima) Disney’s 1999 high-swinging feature Tarzan, which won an Oscar and a Golden Globe for Best Music/Original Song (Phil Collins’ “You’ll Be in My Heart“). He directed (with Ash Brannon) 2007’s Oscar-nominated Surf’s Up for Sony Pictures Animation. His credits within animation also include 1989’s The Little Mermaid, The Rescuers Down Under (1990) and Pocahontas (1995).

With original songs by Tony Award winner Robert Lopez (The Book of Mormon, Avenue Q) and Kristen Anderson-Lopez (In Transit), Frozen appears in Disney Digital 3D in select theaters. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/DisneyFrozen.

Cartoon of the Day: Transylvania 6-5000

Transylvania 6-5000

Transylvania 6-5000

Released on this date in 1963, Transylvania 6-5000 was the last Bugs Bunny cartoon directed by Chuck Jones. And this cartoon is thoroughly Chuck. From the backgrounds to the character design to the timing, this short is a one-stop lesson in Jonsian cartoon directing.

After taking a wrong left turn, Bugs ends up in the castle of a bloodthirsty Count. Luckily, Bugs knows the secret work, and confounds the Count’s attempts to retrieve Bugs’ blood.

Note that when Bugs rings the castle doorbell, the chimes play the opening notes of the TV series “Alfred Hitchcock Presents.”

A fitting climax to Jones’ career at Warner Bros, or a cardboard epitaph- what do you think?

Animated Edmond Was a Donkey A Winner at Francophone Fest

Edmond Was a Donkey (Edmond Etait un Ãne (French)

Edmond Was a Donkey (Edmond Etait un Ãne (French)

Franck Dion’s animation “Edmond Etait Un Ane” (“Edmund Was a Donkey”) won the prize for best international short film Friday at the 26th Festival international de cinéma francophone en Acadie, held in Moncton, New Bruswick.

Jurors Chris LeBlanc, Émilie Moreault and Nisk Imbeault recognized the National Film Board of Canada release “for (Dion’s) capacity to create an effect of total immersion in in a skillfully conceptualized universe, and for the universality of the theme that can touch on all human marginalities.”

Tied for the “Coup de coeur du public” prize was Phil Comeau’s feature-length documentary Frédéric Back: Grandeur Nature. Back is a Canadian artist and director of short animated films.

Friday’s award ceremony was held during the festival’s evening at the Capitol theater.

Phineas and Ferb Up for Producers Guild Award

Phineas and Ferb

Phineas and Ferb

Disney Channel’s “Phineas and Ferb” was the sole animated program announced Wednesday as a nominee for the 24th Annual Producers Guild Awards.

Phineas and Ferb is up for the Award for Outstanding Children’s Program. Other shows nominated by the Producers Guild of America in the same category are the live-action Good Luck Charlie (Disney Channel), iCarly (Nickelodeon), Sesame Street (PBS) and The Weight of the Nation for Kids: The Great Cafeteria Takeover (HBO).

Nominees were also announced for the Norman Felton Award for Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Drama; the Danny Thomas Award for Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Comedy; the Award for Outstanding Producer of Non-Fiction Television; the Award for Outstanding Producer of Live Entertainment & Talk Television; the Award for Outstanding Producer of Competition Television; the Award for Outstanding Sports Program; and the Award for Outstanding Digital Series.

All other nominations for the 2013 Producers Guild Award categories will be announced January 3, along with the individual producers.

All 2013 Producers Guild Award winners will be announced January 26 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. This year, the Producers Guild will also award special honors to Bob and Harvey Weinstein, J.J. Abrams, and Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, among others. The 2013 Producers Guild Awards Chair is Michael DeLuca.

Cartoon of the Day: Mexican Joyride

Mexican Joyride

Mexican Joyride

Released sixty-five years ago today, Daffy Duck took a Mexican Joyride down to Tijuana for a little bit of rest and relaxation. Directed by Art Davis, we can never resist picking a Davis cartoon for CotD, even up against Arthur And The Invisibles and Jet Fuel Formula, the very first episode of Rocky and His Friends.

Daffy Duck, singing “Gaucho Serenade,” drives down to Mexico for a vacation. After a burning experience with Mexican food, Daffy takes in the bullfights.

As if at a baseball game, Daffy heckles the bull (“He’s blind as a bat! Throw the phony out!”). The bull chases the duck around the arena. Daffy tries the “Good Neighbor Policy,” offering the bull a “Cigarette? Sparkling champagne? A little gin rummy, perhaps?” Daffy pulls a hat trick, betting the bull to guess what sombrero he’s hiding under. When the bull guesses wrong, he cries over losing his money. Daffy volunteers weapons to help him commit suicide.

The bull chases the duck with a machine gun into town, where the duck packs his bags and drives home, unaware that the bull is in the back seat.

Art once said that this cartoon was inspired by a weekend getaway he and some of the others had in Mexico. Must have been a fun trip! So show the love for Art Davis, and like this cartoon, or rate it on BCDB… where you can also watch it online!

Studio Ghibli Animation Retrospective Coming to Vancouver

Studio Ghibli

Studio Ghibli

Between December 14 and January 3, the Vancity Theatre and The Cinematheque — both located in downtown Vancouver — are co-hosting Castles in the Sky: The Masters of Studio Ghibli.

It’s a major retrospective of films from the world-renowned anime studio Studio Ghibli founded in Tokyo in 1985 by directors Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata and producer Toshio Suzuki.

Perfect for transcending the winter greys, these films prove that Studio Ghibli is every bit the equal of any animation studio in the world or in film history.

All Studio Ghibli films presented at the Vancity Theatre will be screened in 35mm in the English-language versions. All films at the Cinematheque will screen in Japanese-language prints with subtitles.

These films are open to all ages. Princess Mononoke is classified 14A; all other titles are rated G or PG. The Vancity Theatre offers a special rate of $7 for youth under 19.

Tonari No Totoro (My Neighbor Totoro)
“Best Animated Film of All Time”- Time Out Magazine
“Whenever I watch it, I smile, and smile, and smile” – Roger Ebert
Friday, December 14, 6:30 p.m.; Friday, December 21, 5 p.m.; Sunday, December 23, 3:50 p.m.; Monday, December 24, 2 p.m.; Friday, December 28, 2 p.m.
Japan, 1988, 35mm, 86 min., English
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
Voiced by Dakota and Elle Fanning, Tim Daly
Two little girls and their father move into a beautiful old house in the countryside to be near their mother, who is seriously ill in hospital. Largely left to fend for themselves, Mei and her big sister Satsuki encounter a strange and beautiful world of forest sprites named “Totoros.” Miyazaki’s most beloved film is simply magical and magically simple.

Kaze No Tani No Naushika (Nausicaä of the Valley of Wind)
“A joy to watch.”- New York Times
Saturday, December 15, 3 p.m.; Sunday, December 16, 4 p.m.
Japan, 1984, 35mm, 117 min., English
Directed by Hayao Miyazake
Voice cast includes Alison Lohman, Shia LaBeouf, Edward James Olmos, Chris Sarandon
Miyazaki’s first film as writer-director (based on his own successful manga) is an extradinarily rich fantasy film, an eco-allegory set in a feudal, toxic future and a spirited adventure movie. Led by the courageous Princess Nausicaa, the people of the Valley of the Wind are engaged in a perpetual conflict with powerful insects called “ohmu,” guardians of a poisonous (and spreading) jungle.

Sen To Chihiro No Kamikakushi (Spirited Away)
Enchanted and enchanting… fast and funny; weird and wonderful. Mostly wonderful.” – Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian
Saturday, December 15, 5:20 p.m.; Monday, December 17, 6:30 p.m.; Thursday, December 20, 5:30 p.m.; Monday, December 31, 2 p.m.
Japan, 2001, 35mm, 125 min., English, Classification: PG
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
Voices: Daveigh Chase, Suzanne Pleshette, David Ogden Stiers, Michael Chiklis, John Ratzenberger
Chihiro and her parents are en route to a new home when they drive through a mysterious tunnel and enter a deserted town. When her folks start gorging on food and transform into a pair of pigs, Chihiro discovers this place is not quite as empty as she had imagined. This is a place of spirits, gods, monsters and witches.
“Picks up a resonance, weight and complexity that makes it all but Shakespearean…. No other word for it: a masterpiece.” – Tony Rayns, Time Out
“SIX STARS (exception must be made for the exceptional). Spirited Away is a feast of wonderment, a movie classic and a joy that will enrich your existence until you too are spirited away. I don’t expect ever to love a film more.” – Nigel Andrews, Financial Times

Gake No Ue No Ponyo (Ponyo On The Cliff)
“You’ll be planning to see Ponyo twice before you’ve finished seeing it once…. It offers up unforgettable images [..] images that use the logic of dreams to make the deepest possible connection to our emotions, and to our souls.”- Kenneth Turan, NPR
Sunday, December 16, 2 p.m.; Wednesday December 19, 6:30 p.m.; Monday, December 24, 3:45 p.m.; Saturday, December 29, 4:15 p.m.
Japan, 2008, 35mm, 101 min., English
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
Voices: Cate Blanchett, Liam Neeson, Matt Damon
Miyazaki’s strange and beguiling fantasy film about a sea spirit – it’s an odd eco fable about the terrible power of the sea, but illustrated with such beauty and imagination it transports us entirely into another world. Rated G, this is suitable for children of all ages.
“Miyazaki knows the secret language of children; he dives deep into the pool of childhood dreams and fears and, through his animagic, takes children down to where they can breathe, and feel, and be free.” – Richard Corliss, Time

Mononoke Hime (Princess Mononoke)
“Complex, superbly rendered, and wildly eccentric – even by Miyazaki’s own standards.”- J Hoberman, Village Voice
Sunday, December 16, 6:15 p.m.; Tue. December 18, 6:30 p.m.
Japan, 1997, 35mm, 134 min., English, Classification: 14A
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
Voices: Billy Crudup, Billy Bob Thornton, Minnie Driver, Claire Danes, Gillian Anderson.
Set during the Muromachi Period (1333-1568) of Japan, Princess Mononoke is the tale of a mystical fight between humans and the Animal Gods of the forest. Aimed at a slightly older audience than most Ghibli fare (it is classified 14A), this epic folk tale shows the influence of Akira Kurosawa (a Miyazaki fan himself) and of John Ford, too. The film was the most successful ever at the Japanese box office (prior to Titanic), and named the film of the year in Japan’s equivalent to the Academy Awards.
“A symphony of action and images, a thrilling epic of warriors and monsters, forest creatures and magical spells, with an underlying allegory about the relationship of man and nature.” – Roger Ebert

Tenkû No Shiro Rapyuta (Castle in the Sky)
“Frequently astounding.” – Richard Harrington, Washington Post
Saturday, December 22, 12 noon; Sunday, December 23, 5:45 p.m.
Japan, 1986, 35mm, 124 min., English
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
Voices: Anna Paquin, James Van Der Beek, Cloris Leachman
An island in the sky? The story of a young boy who sees a girl floating down from the sky. He comes to her aid in her flight from sky pirates, the army and secret agents. An adventure story influenced by Treasure Island and Gulliver’s Travels, Castle in the Sky is dynamic, imaginative family entertainment with valuable lessons about technology and ignorance.

Kurenai No Buta (Porco Rosso)
“Smooshes fantasy and history into a pastel-pretty yarn as irresistible as his feminism.” – Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times
Saturday, December 22, 4:10 p.m.; Sunday, December 23, 2 p.m.
Japan, 1992, 35mm, 94 min., English
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
Voices: Michael Keaton, Cary Elwes, Susan Egan, David Ogden Stiers
Pigs will fly! This cockeyed tribute to Humphrey Bogart and Ernest Hemingway features an anti-fascist flier (who happens to look like a pig) tracking sky pirates over the Adriatic in the 1930s. An exhilarating romp with a melancholy undertow – and amazing flying machines!
“Teems with Miyazaki’s personal passions [..] rendered with the utmost detail and beauty. As stirring as Casablanca, and as sophisticated as Only Angels Have Wings, it’s a sublime chivalric fable.” Nick Bradshaw, Time Out

Majo No Takkyûbin (Kiki’s Delivery Service)
“Astonishing in its visual splendor and delightfully entertaining, this magical family film about a little witch-in-training, from Japan’s celebrated animator Hayao Miyazaki, is not to be missed.” – Los Angeles Times
Wednesday, December 26, 2 p.m.; Wednesday, January 2, 4:15 p.m.; Thursday, January 3, 2 p.m.
Japan, 1989, 35mm, 103 min., English
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
Voices: Kirsten Dunst, Debbie Reynolds, Phil Hartman, Janeane Garofalo
In keeping with tradition, 13-year-old witch Kiki dusts off her broom and flies away from home for a year of independence and self-discovery in the big city. Her only companion is her beloved black cat, Jiji.

Hauru No Ugoku Shiro (Howl’s Moving Castle)
“A stunning example of a pure, disorienting dream logic that cinema provides all too rarely.”- Joshua Rothkopf, Time Out New York
Thursday, December 27, 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, December 29, 2 p.m.
Japan, 2004, 35mm, 119 min., English
Directed by Hayao Miyazaki
Cast: Voices: Christian Bale, Lauren Bacall, Blythe Danner, Emily Mortimer, Jean Simmons
Teenager Sophie is cursed by the Witch of Waste and finds herself trapped in the body of an old woman, and is unable to tell her mother or anyone else what has happened. She finds help of sorts with the wizard Howl, living as a servant in his astonishing walking castle. Sophie is an innocent who must prove her resourcefulness, courage and conviction in a bewildering, alien world.

Heisei Tanuki Gassen Pompoko (The Raccoon War)
“Pompoko is a delightful, often uproariously funny film, at once childishly irreverent and thoughtfully mature. Being a Ghibli work, it is beautifully rendered and technically impeccable, with a great number of memorable set pieces.”- Tom Mes, Midnight Eye
Thursday, December 27, 2:15 p.m.; Sunday, December 30, 3:30 p.m.
Japan, 1994, 35mm, 119 min., English
Directed by Isao Takahata
Voices: Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Clancy Brown, JK Simmons
Imagine Watership Down, Studio Ghibli-style. Instead of rabbits, we have raccoons. And not just any raccoons – these critters have magical powers of transformation. As their habitat is stripped and paved by the encroaching humans, the good-natured but rather undisciplined forest creatures embark on a campaign of disruption and distraction.

Neko No Ongaeshi (The Cat Returns)
“An enchanting, magical fable with a twisted vein of surrealism.” – Neil Smith, BBC
Friday, December 28, 3:45 p.m.; Sunday, December 30, 5:45 p.m.; Monday, December 31, 4:20 p.m.
Japan, 2002, 35mm, 75 min., English
Directed by Hiroyuki Morita
Voices: Anne Hathaway, Cary Elwes, Judy Greer, Elliot Gould, Tim Curry
Schoolgirl Haru bravely saves a cat’s life – and finds herself summoned to the Kingdom of the Cats for her pains, where she is to become the wife of the Cat Prince! When she refuses, she starts sprouting whiskers and furry ears…. What’s a girl to do?

Mimi O Sumaseba (Whisper of the Heart)
“A beautiful film.” – David Jenkins, Time Out
Wednesday, Janurary 2, 2 p.m.; Thursday, January 3, 4 p.m.
Japan, 1995, 35mm, 111 min., English
Directed by Yoshifumi Kondo
Voices: Brittany Snow, Cary Elwes, David Gallagher, Courtney Thorne Smith
A lovely change of pace from Studio Ghibli, this is a teenage first-love story, set in a realistically observed modern day Tokyo. Bookish schoolgirl Shizuku meets her soul mate with a little help from a portly cat.

Call the Film Info Line at (604) 683-FILM (3456) for the latest info and listings.

Cartoon Of The Day: Hittin’ The Trail For Hallelujah Land

Hittin' The Trail For Hallelujah Land

Hittin’ The Trail For Hallelujah Land

Released this day in 1931, Hittin’ The Trail For Hallelujah Land is a founding member of the infamous Censored Eleven is also one of the least seen… I guess that is the point of being censored.

A kindly old Uncle Tom brings Fluffy down to her sweetheart Captain Piggy’s riverboat. As he drives back in his horse and buggy, Uncle Tom ends up in a graveyard where various skeletons come to life singing the title song. Uncle Tom flees the graveyard but falls in the river where Piggy saves him. As Piggy comes to Uncle Tom’s rescue, a villain tries to make off with Fluffy.

In 1968, United Artists (then owners of the A.A.P. library of pre-1948 Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons) compiled the cartoons they considered too potentially offensive to be shown on television, and withheld those cartoons from distribution. AT that time, UA felt that these eleven cartoons should be withheld from broadcast because the depictions of black people in the cartoons were deemed too offensive for contemporary audiences.

This cartoon is one of those withheld from distribution, one of the so-called “Censored 11.” (The “Eleven” are: Hittin’ the Trail for Hallelujah Land (MM,1931), Sunday Go to Meetin’ Time (MM, 1936), Clean Pastures (MM, 1937), Uncle Tom’s Bungalow (MM, 1937), Jungle Jitters (1938), The Isle of Pingo Pongo (MM, 1938), All This and Rabbit Stew (MM, 1941), Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (MM, 1943), Tin Pan Alley Cats (MM, 1943), Angel Puss (LT, 1944), and Goldilocks and the Jivin’ Bears (MM, 1944)). More recently, when Ted Turner became owner of the library, he continued the ban, and refused to allow any of these cartoons to be shown or released on video. To date, these shorts have not been officially broadcast on television since 1968.

Soundtrack:

  • Hittin’ the Trail for Hallalujah Land,” Music by Rube Bloom, Lyrics by Joe Young, Sung by Various Characters
  • De Camptown Races,” Music by Stephen Foster; “Mysterious Mose,” Music by Walter Doyle

So watch this one today, and let us know what you think- rightly suppressed or much ado about nothing???

Gumball Gets Two British Academy Kids’ Animation Awards

Brian Cosgrove

Brian Cosgrove (left) was presented with the Special Award at the British Academy Children’s Awards by long-standing friend and colleague David Jason.

Cartoon Network Europe series “The Amazing World Of Gumball” was the winner in both the Animation and Writing categories Sunday at the British Academy Children’s Awards.

The show, which airs on Cartoon Network UK, was produced in association with Dandelion Studios, Boulder Media and Studio Soi.

Ben Bocquelet, Mic Graves and Joanna Beresford were singled out for their work in animation, Bocquelet, James Lamont and Jon Foster were honored as the writers.

Other British Academy Children’s Award nominees for animation were The Amazing Adrenalini Brothers (Pesky Productions/POP), The Gruffalo’s Child (Magic Light Pictures in association with Studio Soi/BBC One) and The Mechanical Musical Marvel (Chris Randall and Julie Boden; Second Home Studios/THSH Birmingham).

In Pre-School Animation, the winner was Peppa Pig (Philip Hall, Joris van Hulzen and Phil Davies; Astley Baker Davies/Five).

Others nominated for Pre-School Animation were Rastamouse (Greg Boardman, Eugenio Perez and Derek Mogford; The Rastamouse Company/CBeebies), Timmy Time (Jackie Cockle, Liz Whitaker and David Scanlon; Aardman Animations/CBeebies) and Tree Fu Tom (Daniel Bays and Adam Shaw; Plug-in Media/Blue Zoo Productions/CBeebies).

The award in the International category was given to SpongeBob SquarePants (Paul Tibbitt, Casey Alexander and Zeus Cervas; MTV Networks International/United Plankton Pictures/Nickelodeon UK).

The animated Share A Story 2011 (Dave Hickman, Carl Hadley and David Heslop; CiTV Creative/CiTV) won in the Short Form category.

CBBC was named Channel Of The Year, defeating CBeebies, CiTV and Cyw.

Brian Cosgrove, the man behind classic children’s animations The BFG, Count Duckula, DangerMouse and many more, was honoured with the Special Award for outstanding creative contribution to the industry.

Cosgrove formed Manchester-based animation studio Cosgrove Hall with his business partner Mark Hall in 1975. The studio quickly established itself as the leading producer of animated programmes in the United Kingdom. It created shows and films that have entertained millions of people all over the world, including Bill and Ben, Noddy, Rainbow and Chorlton and the Wheelies.

The Special Award was presented to Cosgrove by long-standing friend and colleague David Jason.

“I had the pleasure of working with Brian Cosgrove and Mark Hall a number of times, and it was always a joy. The quality of the creative work, the high standard on which they based every detail of every project was so reassuring for one of the newer people like me,” Debra Gillett explained.

“No matter how long the day, work was always fun, and felt like a family getting together every time we met to record the next set of episodes. Cossie, as he was affectionately known by some, knew what he wanted down to the last minute detail, and the result was wonderful, original shows which were enjoyed all over the world. I am so pleased that his work is being recognized with this well-deserved award.”

Cosgrove and the team at Cosgrove Hall were also champions of Manchester’s arts and cultural scene, so much so that members of Joy Division (Bernard Sumner), The Stone Roses (John Squire) and Inspiral Carpets (Craig Gill) all worked under Cosgrove and Hall’s tutelage at some point in the studio’s life.

Said Cosgrove: “After 40 years of making children’s programs, it is an honor and a privilege to be receiving this Special Award from BAFTA. On hearing I would receive the Award, I was thrilled!

“I’ve been lucky in many ways, particularly that I’ve spent my whole career doing what I would have chosen to do as a hobby, and I was fortunate in finding the right person, Mark Hall, to work alongside. Together, we built a company that gave work to a whole generation of artists and filmmakers, and hopefully, via the programs we made, brought pleasure to many generations of viewers.”

In the BAFTA Kids’ Vote, the partly animated The Smurfs won for Feature Film.

Sunday’s ceremony took place at the London Hilton on Park Lane.