Charlie Brown Christmas Named to Nat’l Registry

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A Charlie Brown Christmas

A Charlie Brown Christmas

An album with tracks from the 1965 cartoon special A Charlie Brown Christmas is among the sound recordings selected Wednesday for induction into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress.

A Charlie Brown Christmas introduced jazz to millions of listeners. The 1970 television soundtrack album of the same name includes expanded themes from the animated Peanuts special, as well as jazz versions of both traditional and popular Christmas music, performed primarily by the Vince Guaraldi Trio.

The original music is credited to pianist Guaraldi and TV producer Lee Mendelson. Best remembered is the “Linus and Lucy” theme, originally composed by Guaraldi for an earlier Peanuts project, which remains beloved by fans of the popular TV specials, those devoted to the daily newspaper comic strip, and music lovers alike.

The voices of former slaves, the sounds of Native American culture, the creative wordplay of “Rapper’s Delight,” Donna Summer’s electric 1977 hit and the only surviving recording of a stage icon are among the other sound recordings chosen for the registry. Marking the 10th anniversary of the registry, Librarian of Congress James H. Billington selected 25 sound recordings that will be preserved as cultural, artistic and/or historical treasures for generations to come.

“America’s sound heritage is an important part of the nation’s history and culture, and this year’s selections reflect the diversity and creativity of the American experience,” said Billington. “These songs, words and natural sounds must be preserved for future generations.”

Under the terms of the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the Librarian, with advice from the Library;s National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB), is tasked with selecting annually 25 recordings that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and are at least 10 years old. The selections for the 2011 registry bring the total number of recordings to 350.

The selections named to the registry feature a diverse array of spoken-word and musical recordings — representing nearly every musical category — spanning the years 1888-1984. They cover a great breadth of sounds and music, ranging from the first commercial recording and the authoritative voice of journalist Edward R. Murrow to the innovative music of Hawaiian Sol Hoopii and the novelty of the all-women’s jazz band International Sweethearts of Rhythm.

Among this year’s selections are Dolly Parton’s autobiographical song, “Coat of Many Colors”; Prince and the Revolution’s “Purple Rain,” the soundtrack from Prince’s 1984 movie debut; Leonard Bernstein’s debut performance with the New York Philharmonic; the 1912 “Come Down Ma Evenin’ Star,” the only surviving recording of Lillian Russell, who is considered one of the greatest stars of the American musical stage; the Grateful Dead”s 1977 Barton Hall concert; and the pioneering hip-hop album Rapper’s Delight.

Other additions to the registry feature notable performances by Ruth Etting, Bo Diddley, the Dixie Hummingbirds, Love, Parliament, Booker T. & the M.G.’s, and the Gregg Smith Singers.

Nominations were gathered through online submissions from the public and from the NRPB, which comprises leaders in the fields of music, recorded sound and preservation. The Library is currently accepting nominations for the next registry at the NRPB website (www.loc.gov/nrpb/).

As part of its congressional mandate, the Library is identifying and preserving the best existing versions of each recording on the registry. These recordings will be housed in the Library’s Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia, a state-of-the-art facility that was made possible through the generosity of David Woodley Packard and the Packard Humanities Institute, with benefaction from the U.S. Congress. The Packard Campus (www.loc.gov/avconservation/) is home to more than six million collection items, including nearly three million sound recordings.

2011 National Recording Registry (Listing in Chronological Order)

1. Edison Talking Doll cylinder (1888)
2. “Come Down Ma Evenin’ Star,” Lillian Russell (1912)
3. “Ten Cents a Dance,” Ruth Etting (1930)
4. “Voices from the Days of Slavery,” Various speakers (1932-1941 interviews; 2002 compilation)
5. “I Want to Be a Cowboy’s Sweetheart,” Patsy Montana (1935)
6. “Fascinating Rhythm,” Sol Hoopii and his Novelty Five (1938)
7. “Artistry in Rhythm,” Stan Kenton & and his Orchestra (1943)
8. Debut performance with the New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein (November 14, 1943)
9. International Sweethearts of Rhythm: Hottest Women’s Band of the 1940s (1944-46)
10. “The Indians for Indians Hour” (March 25, 1947)
11. “Hula Medley,” Gabby Pahinui (1947)
12. “I Can Hear It Now,” Fred W. Friendly and Edward R. Murrow (1948)
13. “Let’s Go Out to the Programs,” The Dixie Hummingbirds (1953)
14. “Also Sprach Zarathustra,” Fritz Reiner and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (1954, 1958)
15. “Bo Diddley” and “I’m a Man,” Bo Diddley (1955)
16. “Green Onions,” Booker T. & the M.G.’s (1962)
17. “Forever Changes,” Love (1967)
18. “The Continental Harmony: Music of William Billings,” Gregg Smith Singers (1969)
19. “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” Vince Guaraldi Trio (1970)
20. “Coat of Many Colors,” Dolly Parton (1971)
21. “Mothership Connection,” Parliament (1975)
22. Barton Hall concert by the Grateful Dead (May 8, 1977)
23. “I Feel Love,” Donna Summer (1977)
24. “Rapper’s Delight,” Sugarhill Gang (1979)
25. “Purple Rain,” Prince and the Revolution (1984)

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About Paul Anderson

Paul is an old-timer here at BCDB- his contributions go back to before the site! Paul is widely regarded as a Disney historian, and is also on staff at the Disney Museum in San Francisco. Paul is also a contributing historian for D23, the Disney Club. Paul has published several books and magazine articles on Disney history, too. You are welcome to drop Paul a line here.

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